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Then and Now:

North

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Then & Now, Main

Then & Now, Trolley

Then & Now, Roland Ave.

Then & Now, North

Then & Now, East

Then & Now, South

Then & Now, West

 
 

While none of the scenes in this web site's "north" section is technically within Roland Park, the area north of Northern Parkway has long been of interest to trolley and train buffs (such as the editor). Through this area at one time or another ran the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad, the National Central Railroad, the Western Maryland Rail Road and the no. 24 streetcar, the latter the greater Roland Park area's last trolley line.

The photo at left shows a southbound Northern Central Railway train at the Hollins Station in Robert E. Lee Park. Beyond the bluff on the right is the popular "dogwalkers' peninsula" just above Lake Roland dam. The main body of Lake Roland is beyond and to the left. Hollins Station was closed in 1926 and burned down in 1933, so this photo predates at least the latter of those two dates. (The source says c. 1930.) The signal and the telegraph pole are prominent in the 1950s shot at set 9, below, and the now toppled telegraph pole still survives among the bushes in this nowadays completely overgrown area. See set 9. (Photo: R.K. Henry, in Jim Holechek. 2004. Two Cross Keys Villages: One Black, One White. New York, N.Y.: iUniverse.) Click photos for larger images.

     
 
     
   

Religious and Educational Institutions

Set 1

 

Mapped Scene:

The seminary is clearly visible on the Matthews map of 1935. The photographer is approaching the west wing via the Belvedere Avenue (Northern Parkway) driveway. The red circle shows the photographer's position.

Map: Matthews, 1935.

 

 

Scene: As an organization, St. Mary's Seminary was formed in 1791, making it oldest Catholic seminary in the United States. It is operated by the Sulpician Fathers. The seminary's original site was on Paca Street, downtown. The seminary moved to its current Roland Park-area location in 1929. The present building was designed by Maginnis and Walsh of Boston. Here, the building is still under construction.

Orig. caption: "St. Mary's Seminary — 1929."

Date: 1929.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: The façade of the seminary has changed remarkably little since 1929, as shown here. There is a new addition immediately west of the old building (part of which can be seen at the far right of this modern shot). Also, a large chapel was added to the rear of the building in the 1940s, though obviously this cannot be seen in this photo.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 2

 

 

Scene: The scene is what was at the time the seminary's general assembly room, which took up a large portion of the ground floor of the western end of the building (the part closer to the viewer in the set 1 photos).

Orig. caption: "Assembly Room. St. Mary's Seminary, Roland Park, Baltimore, Maryland. Founded 1791. At Roland Park 1929."

Date: Unknown but probably the 1930s.

Photographer: Stadler Photo Co.

Source: Undated postcard; editor's collection.

 

 

Commentary: It is impossible to duplicate the historic photo at left because the old assembly room has long since been divided into comparatively small classrooms. This photo was taken in the westernmost of the classrooms, which it to say at the far end of the scene shown in the old photo (which was shot from the back wall of what is now the easternmost of the classes).


Date: December 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 3

 

Mapped Scene:

The Visitation Convent itself is not shown in the 1935 Matthews map, but is fractionally north of the red circle, which marks the photographer's position.

Map: Matthews, 1935.

 

 

Scene: Here the photographer is looking north at the east-facing façade of the Visitation Convent. The Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary was founded in 1610 in France. In 1833, the order established its first convent in the U.S., in Georgetown, then a town in its own right in the still quite new District of Columbia. A Baltimore convent followed in 1837. At present, there are 21 Visitation convents in America. The original Baltimore location was a house at the corner of Green and Mulberry streets. The order moved its Baltimore establishment to 5712 Roland Avenue in New North Roland Park in 1927, going on to sell the building to a developer in the late 1970s, who turned it into condominiums.

Orig. caption: "Visitation Convent — Roland Park, Baltimore 10, Md." [Here "10" is the city postal district, now ZIP code 21210 — Ed.]

Date: Unknown but probably the 1930s.

Photographer: Albertype Co., Brooklyn, N.Y.

Source: Undated postcard; Leslie Goldsmith collection.

 

 

Commentary: The developer that bought the Visitation Convent building in 1977, James Ward III, did a nice job retaining the historic appearance of the exterior, though the development of the land behind the building for townhouses caused resentment among local residents.

In addition to being a convent, the Visitation center also housed the Baltimore Academy of the Visitation, which boasted of being the first Catholic school in Baltimore to have a kindergarten. Initially for girls only, the school later took girls from kindergarten through the 8th grade and boys through the 5th grade. A period ad for the school is here. (Source: Roland Park Co., Gardens, Houses and People, November 1938; Pinto collection).

Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

       
 
         

Set 4

 

Mapped Scene:

This section of the 1922 Baltimore City topographical map shows the Gordon estate before Bryn Mawr's purchase of the part south of Melrose Avenue and also before the development of the northern part, which became The Orchards neighborhood. The current school gatehouse is known to be a remnant of the old estate and it is clearly visible on this map excerpt.

Map: Balt. City, 1922.

 

 

Scene: The Bryn Mawr School for girls was established in 1885 and the original campus was on Cathedral Street. In 1928, the school bought 26 acres of the Douglas Gordon estate known as "The Orchards" (still the name of the surrounding neighborhood). The school spent the next several years developing the campus. The gatehouse pictured here is a remnant of the old Gordon property. A number of the earlier school buildings on the campus were purposefully built with stone from the same quarry as had provided the stone for the gatehouse.

Orig. caption: "Bryn Mawr School Gatehouse — 1928."

Date: 1928.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: The old Gordon estate gatehouse has been dramatically altered over the decades. The north-side chimney has been removed and an attic dormer added in its place. The attractive terra cotta roof tiles have been replaced by asphalt shingles. On the north side (to the left), three second-floor windows have been inserted. Most radically, the Gordons' modest two-column portico has been supplanted by an extensive porch/balcony on the west façade.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
   
Along the Tracks
         

Set 5

 

Mapped Scene:

The Ma & Pa line is clearly shown on the 1935 Matthews map. Note that the map is incorrect in one respect. It shows the Bryn Mawr school and gatehouse at the bottom of the campus property and east of Stony Run. In fact, they were and are at the top of the property and west of the stream (just under the "E" of "Melrose").

Map: Matthews, 1935.

 

 

Scene: Belvedere Avenue (now Northern Parkway), looking west by northwest at the former C&P telephone exchange, now part of the Bryn Mawr School. Today, the Gilman-to-Bryn Mawr footbridge stands above this site. The single-track line in the foreground is that of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad, known as the "Ma & Pa." A half-mile of so north of here, the line swung east around the top of the Elkridge golf course and went on through Towson, eventually ending up in York, Pennsylvania. In Towson, it passed immediately south of where the public library now stands. The bridge that carried the tracks across York Road was demolished in 1959 but its abutments remain. (Bridge photo source: Wikipedia entry for Towson, Maryland.)

Orig. caption: "The Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad's grade crossing at Belvedere Avenue. The Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company's 'Tuxedo' central office exchange building is seen in the center. This square brick building was later converted to a house. The telephone poles with multiple cross arms brought in long distance lines from Towson."

Date: September 11, 1938.

Photographer: Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad Co., photo by Leopold.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The old C&P telephone exchange became a private house after it was no longer needed for phone purposes. It was bought in 1998 by the Bryn Mawr school, which turned it into administrative offices. The train tracks used to run along what is currently the driveway to the parking lot at the rear of the building. Visible at the extreme right of this modern photo is the underside of the footbridge to the Gilman School.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 6

 

 

Scene: The scene is as above but taken a couple of decades later. The photo is from the Baltimore County Public Library's web site, which gives it a 1983 date. However, this must be incorrect, for reasons explained in the column to the right.

Orig. caption: "A building, once located at 600 Northern Parkway and Belvedere Avenue in the Govans neighborhood of Baltimore, which housed the Tuxedo exchange of the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Company. The 'I remember' column in the Baltimore Sun of July 12, 1953, described the building in 1906. Newton P. Johnson and his cousin Lee Johnson handled all long-distance calls going in and out of Baltimore. The long distance exchange equipment was on the second floor of the building. The third floor handled the Tuxedo exchange of some 500 phones (up to 13,000 by 1953). Johnson wrote that Omaha was the farthest long distance you could reach from Baltimore in 1906. The first floor, known as the test room, had telegraph and telephone equipment."

Date: Circa 1960.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The new Gilman-to-Bryn Mawr footbridge is plainly visible from this angle. In the old photo, the photographer is rather closer to the C&P building than is the photographer of this modern shot. This is because Northern Parkway is about twice was wide as Belvedere Avenue used to be, with the additional pavement having been added on the south (westbound) side. The photographer of the old image was actually standing about where the white lane-separating line is in the middle of the modern photo.

The historic photo in the left column can with certainty be placed in a four-year window. The Ma & Pa line to downtown Baltimore fell into disuse in summer 1958. Belvedere Avenue was widened into Northern Parkway in 1962. Here, the Ma & Pa tracks across the road are still present, but the line is obviously no longer used: nearer to the photographer, the ties are still extant but the rails have gone. On the other hand, the road is just as obviously the non-divided Belvedere Avenue and not the divided, multi-lane Northern Parkway. Without doubt, therefore, the photo was taken between 1958 and 1962, perhaps in about 1960.


Date: July 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 7

 

Mapped Scene:

I have here marked what I assume to be the scene of the photo at right. While my modern rendition of the scene does not appear identical, there is nowhere else between Cold Spring and Stevenson lanes that even remotely fits. If any readers can shed any light on this, please contact the page editor. If any of these children still lives in the area (they would in in their mid- to late sixties in 2010), I would love to hear from them.

Map: Gross, 1950.

 

 

Scene: This scene is probably immediately to the southwest of the Bryn Mawr School campus, where the train track curved slightly westward, as shown here (in other words, a little to the north of the C&P building that is the subject of the previous set, set 6). There is another version of this scene in Eileen Higham's Tuscany-Canterbury: A Baltimore Neighborhood History, taken by the same photographer but a few seconds later. In Higham's book, the date is given as 1954. (This latter photo is reproduced immediately below.)

Orig. caption: "Children watch as the Maryland & Pennsylvania (also known as the 'Ma & Pa' railroad) engine #29 chugs northwest through Roland Park near the Baltimore City/County line."

Date: March 1952 (according to source, but possibly 1954).

Photographer: James Gallagher.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: I am not certain that this is the same scene as that pictured at right, though it probably is. Certainly, the Ma & Pa ran along here. The right-of-way is the flat muddy area running diagonally from bottom right to middle left. The white-walled, slate-roofed garage approximately perpendicular to the right-of-way is presumably the white-roofed building visible to the right in the old photo, just behind the closest telephone pole. Per the description in the original caption, this setting is near, or at least quite near, the city/county line (being just over half a mile due south of it).


Date: December 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         

 

 

 

Scene: This photo was taken a few seconds after the one above and by the same photographer. The girls have moved on but the two boys are in about the same place. Had I not come across this photo, and had I only found the less clear, fractionally earlier shot (see above), I probably would have been satisfied that my modern photo was of the same scene. However, this photo is very clear — and it is this clarity that results in my uncertainty, as described on the right.

Orig. caption: "Ma and Pa Railroad, 1954."

Date: 1954 (according to source, but possibly 1952).

Photographer: James Gallagher.

Source: Tuscany-Canterbury.

 

 

Commentary: There are a number of points militating for and against the modern photo's being of the correct scene, as follows:

1. For: The children are pretty obviously standing on a footpath of some sort and to this day there is in more or less this place a footpath across the Ma & Pa right-of-way from the Bryn Mawr campus to the southeastern corner of the New North Roland Park neighborhood. Also, the slate-roofed garage is certainly in about the right place. Last, the photo from the Higham book shows a dormer-windowed house beyond the garage, and there is indeed a house with dormer windows beyond the garage, the very top of the roof of which can just be seen in the modern photo, though it is not visible at all clearly. A modern shot of this house from a different angle is above.

2. Against: The devil is in the

details, however. In the two old photos, the land falls away to the left on this side of the tracks and rises on the far side of the tracks. In the modern photo, the land plainly rises on this side of the right-of-way and is more or less level on the far side. It is possible that Bryn Mawr may at some point have built up the land east of the right-of-way, perhaps for its south access road. But there is no explanation for the previously rising far-side ground to be level now. Turning to the dormered house beyond the garage, this is plainly visible above the garage in the photo from the Higham book; in the modern photo, nothing like as much of it can been seen above the garage roof line, despite the modern photographer's apparently higher vantage point. Finally, and inescapably, the dormers are different. As the second modern photo shows, the house has two dormers, low set and of unequal size. But as the inset detail from the Higham book picture shows, the dormers should be high set and equally sized.

Date: December 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 8

 

Mapped Scene:

The Homeland Station is shown on this portion of an undated Ma & Pa route map. Wikipedia says of this map, "Route map of the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad (the 'Ma and Pa') in the 1930s-1950s, which appeared in numerous non-copyrighted timetables and publications before 1958." The whole map is here.

Map: Undated Ma & Pa timetable map.

 

 

Scene: The photo shows the southwest corner of the old Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad Homeland Station. The photographer is facing northeast. The façade to the right is the back of the building. The porch-covered façade to the left is the west side of the building, from which passengers emerged and boarded the train. The tracks, below the line of view, ran parallel to the west side of the building and are here between it and the photographer. The building fronted onto Lake Avenue, where the entrance was.

Orig. caption: "The Ma & Pa (Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad) Homeland station, built 1888 on West Lake Avenue in Roland Park, has been converted to a stylish residence."

Date: January 1940.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The Homeland Station building is currently a most pleasing house north of Roland Park. The rail right-of-way is now the property's driveway. The current (2010) owner has kept the building's interior reminiscent of a train station.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

In addition to the water tower it built near the Roland Park fire house (see set 6, "west"), it has long been known that the Roland Park Co. also built a second tower near the Lake and Roland avenues intersection. Now long demolished, its exact whereabouts have been elusive. This 1922 city map shows that the tower was located immediately south of the Homeland Ma & Pa station. (Map: Baltimore City, 1922.)

         
 
         

Set 9

 

Mapped Scene:

This detail from the 1898 Bromley map shows the Lake Roland area, with Hollins Station clearly marked. This is the same scene as the banner photo at the top of the page.

Map: Bromley, 1898.

 

 

Scene: Looking north from the western bluff of "dogwalkers' peninsula" in Robert E. Lee Park toward the main body of Lake Roland. The former Northern Central Railway (NCR) line in the foreground is now used by the Baltimore area Light Rail system (having been relaid). The line to the left is the Greenspring branch of the NCR, which was also used by the Western Maryland Rail Road (WMRR) to connect trains to its station at Owings Mills. This branch trackage, despite falling into disuse decades ago, is still extant, if overgrown, running from near this vantage point about a mile around the western shore of the lake before petering out. Of the station building shown here, there is now barely a trace.

Orig. caption: "The Relay House, or Hollins Station, at Lake Roland is pictured in a Sun rotogravure section reprinted in the 1950s. Lake Roland is at back with bridge at left [sic, i.e., right]. The station, which served the Greenspring branch of the Northern Central Railway, was closed in 1926 and destroyed by fire in 1933. The lower photograph shows its site today."

Date: 1880s.

Photographer: Unknown photographer, Baltimore Sun. This is the credit given on the Baltimore County Public Library web site though, in fact, the credit probably refers to the 1950s photo below.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The rocky outcrop in the foreground is I believe the same one as shown in the historical photo at left. Today foliage prevents the modern photographer from climbing to as high a vantage point was was the case in the 1880s. The Greenspring branch's actual junction, as in the old photo, was to the left and just out of the photo. The site of the old station itself is a little beyond the first utility pole on the left of the tracks. This area is now densely wooded, the trees being of quite recent vintage; they are almost entirely absent in the second (1950s) historic shot (below and left). The photographer of the banner photo at the top of this page was standing on the opposite side of the tracks from this spot.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
   

 

Scene: Same as above. The original caption of the 1880s shot above refers to a "photo below." I believe this is it. This 1950s photo was taken about 70 years after the 1880s shot above and 20-odd years after the station building had burned down. Whereas in the 1880s there had been two tracks and a siding on the westward-heading branch of the WMRR, by the 1950s there was but the one line (a mile of so of which is still in place).

Orig. caption: "A locomotive is arriving at the Relay House or Hollins Station. The station, which served the Greenspring Branch of the Northern Central Railway, was closed in 1926 and destroyed by fire in 1933. Note the short 6-pin cross arms on the railroad signal pole (not a BG&E pole). This style was unique to the Northern Central line in Baltimore County, and was replaced in the early 1950's."

Date: 1950s.

Photographer: Unknown photographer, Baltimore Sun.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

   

x

   

 

Sense of the Scene: Close inspection reveals that of the old Hollins Station there is more than meets the eye. These four photos were all taken in the area immediately around the tall utility pole in the 1950s shot to the left. Clockwise from top left:

1. Nestling in the undergrowth, a marble block from old station building.

2. More marble blocks from the station building. In the foreground is a toppled utility pole, presumably the tall pole beyond the signal in the 1950s photo. The Light Rail tracks are in the background.

3. Section of the Greenspring branch line in the immediate vicinity of the station. This is the line curving off to the left in the two historic photos.

4. The same section of track as shown in 3, but from a different viewpoint.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 10

 

Mapped Scene:

The 1915 Bromley map from which this section is excerpted was made at about the same time as the 1917 photo on the left.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking east from the Greenspring branch back toward the back of Hollins Station. The southern shore of the main body of Lake Roland is out of sight but immediately to the left. (In the 1880s photo of Hollins Station, there is a boxcar to the left in the background. This photo here was taken from approximately that place.) The back of the station building can be seen behind the last of this train's cars. The line along which this train is traveling is the left-turning line shown images above. Rusted and overgrown, a certain amount of this track remains, starting approximately here and extending to the left about a mile (back over the photographer's left shoulder).

Orig. caption: "Western Maryland Railway #3, westbound, at the Hollins station (in Lake Roland area) on the Greenspring Branch."

Date: September 4, 1917.

Photographer: W. Raymond Hicks.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: A stroll around the western shore of the main body of Lake Roland will quickly bring one to a mile or so of inexplicable railroad trackage. This is all that is left of the Greenspring branch of the NCRR. This photo was taken about a quarter of a mile west of the old Hollins Station site and is therefore approximately the scene of the photo at left. The old photo shows three tracks. However, as the 1950s shot in set 9 reveals, the trackage was at some point reduced to a single line, which is what remains today.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 11

 

Mapped Scene:

The map shows that the photographer is standing on the north bank of the small body of Lake Roland. The Walters mansion referred to in the original caption at right had by the late 1890s been bought by the Leakins.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking south from the north shore of the small body of Lake Roland. Hollins Station is in the background and the causeway that today carries the Light Rail is plainly visible. When this photo was taken, the causeway carried the NCR tracks.

Orig. caption: "Lake Roland" on photo. On BCPL web site, "A view across Lake Roland looking toward the Northern Central Railway's Hollins Station. The bridge across the lake is clearly visible in the center with the station to its left. On the hill at the right, partially obscured by trees, is the F.K. Walters mansion. The station was in its heyday around 1880, but served a decreasing number of passengers until it was closed in 1926. The building was destroyed by fire in 1933."

Date: 1886.

Photographer: A.H. Brinkmann.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: If instead of turning west along the Greenspring branch at Hollins Station a train were to have carried straight on, the NCR line would have carried it over the Lake Roland causeway and bridge, which separated — and still separate — the main (western) body of the lake from this, the small (eastern body) immediately above the dam. The scene today is considerably more overgrown than it was in 1886 but is recognizable nevertheless. The causeway is no different, though the bridge itself is a modern replacement. Hollins station stood about where the very dark foliage is at the far end of the causeway. Of the Walters/Leakin mansion on the hill, there is now no sign.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 12

 

Mapped Scene:

The Brightside Station is shown but not named on this portion of the undated Ma & Pa route map. Riderwood (here called Rider) is the next stop to the north. The previous stop to the south is Hollins Station (here called Lake Roland).

Map: Undated Ma & Pa timetable map.

 

 

Scene: Looking west across the main body of Lake Roland. The photographer has his back to Brightside Road, about 200 yards behind him; Hollins Station is a short distance to the left. There is now no trace of this structure, known variously as the Lake or Brightside stop.

Orig. caption: "A small wooden waiting shed stood at Northern Central Railway's Lake Station at Lake Roland."

Date: 1958. If this man is a passenger, he is one of the last; in 1959 passenger service was almost entirely eliminated and the trackage reduced to a single line. Freight service continued until 1972, when the company went under.

Photographer: Fred Hohenstein.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The NCR Brightside stop was nothing more than a shelter at the side of the tracks. There is not a scrap of it remaining today and so we cannot be certain of its precise location. Suffice it to say that it was at approximately this spot, a little north of the old Hollins Station (here some distance to the photographer's left). Lake Roland is in the background; the Light Rail tracks, in the foreground.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
   
Lake Roland/Lakeside
         

Set 13

 

Mapped Scene:

The bridge, dam and pumphouse (here called the gatehouse) are all plainly visible on the 1915 Bromley map.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking northeast at the dam from what was then the iron footbridge across the Jones Falls River.

Orig. caption: "Lake Roland showing a pump house. The dam was designed by James Slade of Hartford, Connecticut, after Baltimore City had purchased the necessary rights-of-way in 1857 for $289,000. Survey for the project was undertaken by a Mr. Wampler and actual construction was carried out by Charles P. Manning. The system included Lake Roland, the Lake Roland dam, the conduit from Lake Roland to Hampden Reservoir, the Hampden Reservoir, the pipe line from Hampden Reservoir to Mt. Royal Reservoir, the Mt. Royal Reservoir, and the network of distribution mains from each reservoir. The conduit from the dam to Hampden Reservoir was finished by January 1, 1860."

Date: 1886.

Photographer: A.H. Brinkmann.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: In its fundamentals, the dam is largely the same as it was in the 1880s. Though now hidden by trees, the overflow system visible at the right of the historical photo is still there. The house behind and to the left of the pumphouse on the old photo has long since been demolished. The dam as it currently appears is the result of extensive restoration work in the 1980s, after the dam and park were taken over by the city Parks and Recreation Department. Prior to this, the dam had fallen into disrepair, as Lake Roland had ceased being a source of municipal water in 1915. The restoration work was given new new urgency after damage suffered by the dam as the result of Tropical Storm David in 1992. Repairs required the draining of Lake Roland, which was refilled in June 1994. A photo of the dam being rebuilt after the storm is here (date, April 1, 1993; photographer, Herbert H. Harwood, Jr.; source, Baltimore County Public Library).


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 14

 

Update:

In the fall of 2009, the 1952 Lake Roland dam bridge was demolished as the result of concerns about its safety.

Photo: D.P. Munro

(Dec. 2009)

 

 

Scene: Looking south from the north bank of the Jones Falls across the iron bridge just below the dam. The road leading left to the pumping station can be seen in the background.

Orig. caption: "Two men standing at one end of the Lake Roland Bridge, a Wendel Bollman wrought iron truss bridge."

Date: Circa 1886.

Photographer: A.H. Brinkmann.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The historic photo of the Lake Roland dam (set 13) was taken from iron truss historic bridge shown at left, just as the new photo of the dam was taken from the (comparatively) modern bridge shown above. Built in 1952, the modern bridge was deemed unsafe in 2008 and closed in the fall of that year. It was demolished in fall 2009.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 15

 

 

Scene: Looking south from the northern toward the southern side of the Lake Roland dam. The building is the pumphouse.

Orig. caption: "Lake Roland dam, Roland Park, Baltimore, Md."

Date: Unknown but about 1919. The card has no publication date, but the postmark is dated April 28, 1919.

Photographer: I. & M. Ottenheimer, Baltimore, Md.

Source: Undated postcard; editor's collection.

 

 

Commentary: Assuming the old photo on the left to have been taken in 1919, this would have been four years after Lake Roland ceased to be a water supply for the city. This perhaps explains the low water level in the picture on the left. The only noticeable differences between the old and new shots are that (a) the new photo's white retaining wall beyond and to the right of the pumphouse is absent on the 1919 photo and (b) the iron railings at the end of the dam's promenade wall in the old photo are not there in the new.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 16

 

Mapped Scene:

The map shows the photographer's approximate position in the modern photo. There is no way of telling precisely where the old photo was taken, though it must have been broadly speaking in this vicinity.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: This unattributed photo shows the very northern end of the no. 24 trolley route, through the exact location cannot be determined. The 24 route initially, in the 1890s, got to Roland Avenue through Hampden and then proceeded up Roland Avenue's full length. Subsequently the route was shortened such that it just shuttled between Lake Roland and the Roland Park Car House on Upland Road. (The no. 10 line still came to Roland Park via Hampden.) From 1940 to 1947, the route was extended to the Roland Water Tower in the south. At the other end of the line, beyond Lake Avenue, it bore northwest to a turning loop somewhere in the vicinity of what was once a leisure park near the Lake Roland dam. This photo cannot be dated precisely, but a window can be established. The photo was taken by the same unknown photographer that took the historic image shown in set 3 of the "south" page of this site. The subject is the same car (no. 5388) and the handwriting on the back of the photo is the same. Because set 3 in "south" can be placed between 1940 and 1947, so it can reasonably be supposed that this photo above was probably — though only probably — taken in that timeframe too.

Orig. caption: "Car #5388. Route 24 to Lakeside."

Date: Unknown but probably between 1940 and 1947.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Leslie Goldsmith collection.

 

 

Commentary: The Lakeside line was abandoned in early 1950. By this time only one car ran on it (no. 5687) and the line was no longer linked in with the rest of the city streetcar system. This was because the lower part of the 24 route, from Lake Avenue southward, had been closed and its trackage removed in 1947, leaving only a small rump north of Lake Avenue. With only one car running on this, there was no need for two tracks. Accordingly, the southbound track was torn up and car 5687 ran forlornly up and down the northbound track from Lake Avenue to Lakeside for a couple of years. On January 28, 1950 it made its last run and was thereafter dismantled on the spot, there being no means of taking it to one of the car houses downtown. The remaining track was then taken out. Much of its right-of-way is now lost within the Elkridge Apartments complex at the top of Roland Avenue. Northwest of this community, certain areas of graded land can still be found, such as that shown above, though there is no way to say with certainty if this modern photo was taken in the same place as the historic photo.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

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