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Then and Now:

Northwest

 

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Then & Now, Roland Ave.

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Then & Now, South

Then & Now, West

 

 

 

Northwestern Roland Park was one of the the more difficult areas to develop for the Roland Park Company, given the hilly terrain. It is characterized by houses built into steep hills, as visible in the background in this photo. This shot was taken just west of the intersection of Englewood and Edgevale roads. The man is standing in the future backyard of what will soon be 8 Englewood Road. Englewood Road itself is obscured from view by the piles of planks in the house-to-be's front yard. (Click here to see how 8 Englewood turned out.) The halfway-built house behind the man is 4-6 Englewood, a duplex. On the other side of Englewood Road, the Dutch-barn style house is 1 Englewood. The houses on the hill are those at the very end of the Longwood Road cul-de-sac. The photo's original caption is, "These building lots reflect the challenge Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. faced in his site design of some of the more difficult terrain in Roland Park. March 11, 1912." (Photo source: Karen Lewand. 1989. North Baltimore: From Estate to Development. Baltimore, Md.: Baltimore City Dept. of Planning.) Click photos for larger images.

     
 
     
   

Along Belvedere Avenue (Northern Parkway)

Set 1

 

Mapped Scene:

The photographer's position just to the west of the Falls Road and Belvedere Avenue intersection is shown. The Egenton Home, shown, was a white girls' orphanage affiliated with First Presbyterian. Founded in 1836 and originally housed on Madison Street, in November 1905 it moved to the 40th Street site now occupied by Keswick Multi-Care. By 1926, it had moved to 1017 St. George's Road. It closed in late 1959 and the land was sold to a developer, who in 1961 built the Belvedere Towers apart-ment building on the lot.

Map: Matthews, 1935.

 

 

Scene: Looking east along Belvedere Avenue — now Northern Parkway — from the southwest corner of Belvedere's intersection with Falls Road. The box on the utility pole is the world's first — literally, the first one off the assembly line — sound-activated traffic signal. It was invented by Charles Adler, Jr. Approaching cars sounded their horns, at which point the light would change in their favor. The device was installed at this location on February 22, 1928.

Orig. caption: "A traffic officer gives directions to a driver at Falls Road and Northern Parkway (then known as Belvedere Avenue). Sign says, 'Stop. Sound horn to clear signal.'"

Date: 1928.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The once comparatively minor Belvedere Avenue was widened into a major highway in 1962, at which point its name was changed to Northern Parkway, with a view to its being a feeder to the then brand-new Jones Falls Expressway (JFX). Like the almost permanently traffic-jammed Cold Spring Lane, in the early 21st century Northern Parkway is a major pedestrian barrier between Roland Park/Tuxedo Park, to is south, and Poplar Hill/New North Roland Park to its north. The Adler signal has been gone for decades, but below is a photo of an elderly Adler installing a commemorative plaque at its former site.


Date: July 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         

 

In Detail:

Close up of a later version of an Adler sound-activated traffic signal, unknown location.

Source: National Museum of American History Archive Center.

 

 

Scene: Same scene as above, taken by the same photographer a few seconds before or afterward. (The car and traffic officer are the same.)

Orig. caption: As above.

Date: 1928.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Scene: Same location as left (intersection of Belvedere Avenue and Falls Road), but looking west. The houses in the background are those on the north side of Belvedere Avenue and, as the 1200 block of W. Northern Parkway, they still exist.

Orig. caption: "Charles Adler Jr. is credited with the title of 'inventor' of the first actuated signals. The first one in daily use was at the corner of Falls Road and Belvedere Avenue in Baltimore. The date was February 22, 1928. The picture above shows Baltimore's famous Traffic Commissioner Henry Barnes (left), inventor Charles Adler Jr. (center), and Assistant Traffic Commissioner Charles Upham, Jr. placing a plaque commemorating the site of the first actuated signal."

Date: Unknown but during Barnes' tenure as traffic commissioner, 1953-1962.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Signalfan.com.

         
         

Set 2

 

Mapped Scene:

The old Belvedere bridge is at the top left of this map excerpt.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

 

 

Scene: Looking west along the Belvedere Street bridge across the Jones Falls and the Northern Central Railroad line. The caption that came with this photo says that there were two spans to this bridge. However, a review of 1930s and 1950s aerial photography reveals there to have been only one.

Orig. caption: On photo: "Belvedere Bridge on N. Central Road." On BCLP web site: "The old Belvedere Street bridge...was completed in 1884. There were two spans, one over the Jones Falls and one over the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks. Both were demolished in 1962."

Date: 1886.

Photographer: A.H. Brinkmann.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The quaint 1884 bridge was replaced by the current six-lane, concrete highway bridge in 1962. The new bridge is neither bicycle nor pedestrian friendly, making it difficult to get from one side of the Jones Falls to the other by any means other than a car.


Date: July 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 3

 

 

Scene: Looking north from the Northern Central Railroad (NCRR) tracks at the old Belvedere Street bridge.

Orig. caption: "The old Belvedere Street bridge...was completed in 1884. There were two spans, one over the Jones Falls and one over the Pennsylvania Railroad tracks. Both were demolished in 1962."

Date: 1908.

Photographer: Robert Bruce Hamilton, Sr.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: It is no longer possible at this location to get down to the level of the train tracks, at least not without risking one's life. The tracks are now sandwiched between the Jones Falls and the tall concrete retaining wall that serves as the embankment for the southbound entrance ramp from Northern Parkway onto the JFX. The retaining wall is obvious on the left of this photo, and the only way to photograph the tracks is to lean over the wall as far as possible. The bridge shown above the tracks is the Northern Parkway bridge that is the subject of the set above.


Date: July 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
   
         

Set 4

 

 

Scene: Looking south from the east bank of the Jones Falls at the demolition of the Belvedere Street bridge. From the photographer's perspective, Falls Road is to the left and the future Sinai Hospital campus is ahead and to the right. The beginnings of a concrete support for the soon-to-be replacement bridge can be seen at the far right of the photo. In the background, between this and the collapsed old bridge can be seen the NCRR tracks.

Orig. caption: "The old Belvedere Street Pratt truss bridge spanned the Jones Falls in the Northern Parkway area."

Date: May 1962.

Photographer: Spinek (News American).

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: As was the case with the modern photo in set 3, it is here, too, impossible exactly to replicate the historic photo, so greatly has the landscape changed. The concrete support visible in the old photo is that just visible toward the right of the photo above, beyond the foliage and under the new bridge itself. This modern photo was taken from the entry ramp from Northern Parkway onto northbound JFX. The original photographer would have been perhaps 60 yards ahead and somewhat to the left (an area now inaccessible).


Date: July 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         
   
Along Falls Road

Set 5

 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking north from the parking lot of the Polytechnic Institute/Western High School complex, which opened in 1967. To the right, on the east side of Falls Road, is the late 1960s remnant of the old Cross Keys Village, a comfortable and mostly African-American neighborhood that had existed since the early 1800s. In the 1960s, all the houses on the west side of Falls were condemned by Baltimore City and razed to make way for the parking lot shown here. Now situated about half a mile to the north, the new Village of Cross Keys is named after the neighborhood shown here.

Orig. caption: "Coach #1212 passes a native while operating out of the Poly-Western High School complex. Some of the 1200's had flush lights, while others had the 'bug-eye' headlights similar to those on the 1100 series coaches"

Date: Unknown but probably the late 1960s.

Photographer: Jack Bloodsworth.

Source: www.btco.net.

 

 

Commentary: The same scene as at left but taken some four decades later. In the old photo, there are five quite prominent houses visible along the east side of Falls Road (toward the right of the shot). Four of these still exist (the one with the flat roof and the two-tiered porch has been demolished). The house furthest to the right in the old shot (partially cut off) is that second to the the right in the new photo (with a porch and red shutters, partially hidden by a tree). The leftmost of the five houses in the old photo, the vaguely churchlike building, is 4723 Falls Road, known by Roland Parkers as the "Stable." (A house now, it was once the stable building for the Symington house above on Ridgewood Road.) In the modern photo, the Stable is hidden by foliage. Despite the condemnation and demolition of dozens of Cross Keys Village houses in the 1960s to make way for this school parking lot, it is in fact rarely if ever filled to capacity.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
   
         

Set 6

 

Mapped Scene:

Short Path (descending from Ridgewood Road) and Oakdale Road (ascending from Falls Road) are shown on this 1935 Matthews map. The old photo at right was taken from about the spot marked by a red circle, the photographer looking north.

Map: Matthews, 1935.

 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking north up Falls Road from a point a little to the north of Cold Spring Lane. Though not visible here, just over the rise, the houses peter out and the golf course lies to right and left. In the 1960s, all the houses on the left of this shot demolished, to be replaced by the Poly/Western parking lot shown in the set above (set 5). A handful of those on the right survive. The road coming in from the right is probably Oakdale Road, this part of which no longer exists, but which terminated on Falls Road about where the entrance is now to the ManorCare northern parking lot.

Orig. caption: None.

Date: 1925, though this same photo appears in Jim Holechek's Two Cross Keys Villages and is there dated circa 1950. The earlier date is more likely correct, judging by the look of the car in the distance.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: www.ron.spath.com.

 

 

Commentary: With the wholesale razing of Cross Keys Village in the 1960s there are, by definition, no landmarks now to compare against the old photo at left. The driveway coming in from the right is that leading to the northside ManorCare parking lot. This lot stands on what was once the 1100 block of Oakdale Road, which intersected with Falls Road at this spot. The 1100 block was not accessible by car from the upper section of Oakdale Road in Roland Park because the drop between Ridgewood and Falls roads was too steep. However, a Roland Park footpath called Short Path, leading off Ridgewood Road, almost connected to this section of Oakdale, with pedestrians scrambling up the bank between Oakdale and Short Path. Short Path still exists, sometimes called Maiden Lane.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 7

 

Sense of The Scene:

Though Spath's house was pulled down in 1985, the lot's distinctive front wall lived on. In 1997, Roland Park resident David F. Tufaro took a number of photos of the neighborhood, including this shot of the then vacant 4700 block of Falls Road. The steps visible at the far right of Tufaro's photo are those shown in the 1973 photo as leading up to Spath's house.

Photo: D.F. Tufaro.

 

 

Scene: Here, the photographer is looking east at the 4700 block of Falls Road. Upon this site now stands the ManorCare facility. The older building shown here was demolished in 1985, though as late as 1997 its handsome fieldstone wall still stood (see photo at left).

Orig. caption: "The picture shown [above] of Anton [Spath's] house was taken about 60 years after his death [in 1913]. Before her marriage to Anton Spath, Augusta lived in the left portion of the duplex. The entire duplex was torn down during the summer of 1985."

Date: Circa 1973.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: www.ron.spath.com.

 

 

Commentary: Something called the Falls Road Office Complex was erected on this lot once Spath's house had been pulled down. There are no known pictures of it. It lasted less than a decade before being bought by Manor Care, which erected this building in the late 1990s.


Date: January 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 8

 

Mapped Scene:

Even a century or so after the devising of this 1915 map, the scene is quite recognizable. The Baltimore Country Club's clubhouse is the yellow rectangle with a dot on it. Hard against Falls Road (next to the word '"road") is the tennis clubhouse, demolished in December 2008. Roland Park developer Edward H. Bouton's Rusty Rocks home — his third in Roland Park — is just to the south of the BCC clubhouse.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking south along Falls Road from a place about a quarter of a mile north of the intersection with Hillside Road. The houses on Hillside can be seen beyond the buggy; they were built between 1902 and 1904. The no. 25 streetcar line is to the left. This line began at Camden Station downtown and terminated at Gwynn Oak Junction on the west side of town. The flat-topped mound east of Falls and north of Hillside is visible in this old photo; in 1906 it will soon be home to the country club's tennis courts.

Orig. caption: "Falls Road in the Cross Keys' Area — 1906."

Date: 1906

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: www.ron.spath.com.

 

 

Commentary: This is the same scene today (2010), though these days, even in winter, neither the Hillside Road houses nor the tennis-court mound can be made out because of the dense trees that have grown up around the mound (the slope of which is just visible to the left of the cars.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 9

 

 

Scene: Looking south along Falls Road from a spot approximately opposite the junction of Falls and Harvest roads, which is to say about 100 yards north of the viewpoint of the previous photo (set 8). The Harvest Road intersection is back over the photographer's left shoulder. Beyond the trolley and mostly hidden by trees is 1st fairway of the Baltimore Country Club course. On the left of the photo, just ahead of the trolley, is the 17th fairway, which straddled Falls Road. The tee was on the west side of the road and the green the east side.

Orig. caption: "A 1930-vintage 'Baltimore Car' glides along one of its favorite stretches. Here, car #6022 sails out Falls Road en route to Belvedere Loop on Falls Road near Harvest, close to the site of today's Cross Keys development."

Date: Unknown but probably 1940s.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: www.btco.net.

 

 

Commentary: In the half-century since the closing of the golf course a number of trees have grown up, such that it would no longer be possible, even absent traffic and chain-link fences, to play the 17th fairway. Apart from the added trees, however, the scene is more or less as it was.


Date: January 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

   
         

Set 10

 

Mapped Scene:

The Falls Road Car House (or car barn) is shown in pink on this 1915 map. Opposite, the western part of the golf course is still shown as Roland Park Co. land because at this stage the BCC still leased the land from the company, having by this time only bought the land east of Falls Road.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: The photographer is standing on the eastern edge of what in a year or two will be main part of the Roland Park golf course, which was west of Falls Road: fairways 2 through 16 and part of 17. (Fairways 1 and 18, and part of 17, were east of Falls Road.) In this photo, Falls Roads runs right to left beyond the fence. The Baltimore and Northern Railway Co. car house — later the no. 25 streetcar line car house — was built in 1897. The car barn was shut in 1936 and sold a decade later, after which point it was demolished for an apartment building.

Orig. caption: "Baltimore and Northern Railway Co. car house on Falls Road about 1897. Presently Robert E. Lee Apartments."

Date: 1897.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: It is not known exactly when the Robert E. Lee apartment building was constructed, but presumably the late 1940s. The owner, The General Lee, Inc., turned the building into condominiums in the late 1970s and early 1980s.


Date: January 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 11

 

Mapped Scene:

This map predates the historic photo by about 15 years.It is possible that the purple bakery building is the one shown on the left side of Falls Road, third down from the Lake intersection (opposite the Roche property).

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking north up Falls Road from a point just south of the Lake Avenue/Falls Road intersection.

Orig. caption: "Some of the buildings along Falls Road near Lake Avenue in the early 20th century still exist today. This view looks north."

Date: February 30, 1930.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: North Baltimore: From Estate to Development.

 

 

Commentary: Though by now (2010) only one building survives from the old photo (the purple one), the scene is nevertheless instantly recognizable for some reason. The purple building, 6070 Falls Road, is currently a French-style bakery.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
   

Along the Tracks to Mt. Washington

         

Set 12

 

Mapped Scene:

The Mt. Washington Club field is clearly marked on the 1915 Bromley map. The three club buildings visible in the photo all appear on the map. The Mt. Washington Mill, currently an upmarket shopping center with an organic supermarket, is shown in pink at the top.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

 

Scene: Looking north up the NCR tracks about 1915-1920 from a point about a quarter of a mile north of Belvedere Avenue (Northern Parkway). Beyond the tracks is Norris Field, at the time owned by the Mt. Washington Club. Until 1903, the land had been owned and used by the Baltimore Cricket Club, but in that year the cricket club merged with the Baltimore Country Club (formerly the Roland Park Golf Club) and from then on played it matches at the country club. At this point, the Mt. Washington Club was created, buying Norris field and using it for various sporting activities. The land was sold to the Bryn Mawr School in 1999.

Orig. caption: "The tracks of the Northern Central Railway ran by the house of the Jessie Baker Mt. Washington estate, the Mt. Washington Club House (built in 1904) and razed in 1959) and Norris Field."

Date: Circa WWI.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Because of, nowadays, the presence of the JFX between the Light Rail tracks and what is left of Norris field, it is not possible to replicate the old photo at left. This modern shot, taken from the northbound JFX entry ramp from Northern Parkway, is about as close as one can get. Here, the photographer is about 100 yards east and 300 yards south of the position of the photographer of the historic photo. In fact, much of the old Norris field was bulldozed to make way for the JFX. The two more prominent buildings in the historic photo both sat on land now part of the highway. (Click here for illustration.)


Date: July 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 13

 

Mapped Scene:

Both the Mt. Washington station and Mount Saint Agnes College (here styled "academy") are prominent on this 1915 map. The mill is on the right.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking north toward the Mt. Washington rail station from the Kelly Avenue bridge. The old station building is in the middle background.

Orig. caption: "The Northern Central Railway tracks running past Weidig's store in Mt. Washington. A building belonging to George Gelbach, intended as a projected 'Mt. Washington House', is at the left."

Date: Circa 1890s.

Photographer: Robert Bruce Hamilton, Jr.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The tracks themselves appear unchanged (though they are in fact new), but nothing else of the old photo remains. The building on the hill in the distance is the former Mount Saint Agnes College, which closed in 1972 and is now conference center. The college, opened in 1890 and operated by the Sisters of Mercy, is faintly visible in the old shot too.


Date: July 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 14

 

 

Scene: This is a close up of the Mt. Washington train station, which is also plainly visible in the middle distance of the set above (set 13). The photographer is on the east side of the tracks, looking northwest.

Orig. caption: "A Northern Central Railway train, traveling from north to south, as it pulls into the station at Mt. Washington. The entire area around the station was inundated by the great flood of 1868, which caused the local residents to seek safety on one of the forested hills in Mt. Washington."

Date: Circa 1900.

Photographer: Robert Bruce Hamilton, Jr.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Local train transit, in a sense, returned to Baltimore in 1992 with the opening of the Light Rail from Timonium to Camden Yards, later extended southwest to the Thurgood Marshall Baltimore/Washington International Airport. The Light Rail uses much of the old NCRR right-of-way, upon which tracks were relaid in the early 1990s. This scene shows the Mt. Washington Light Rail station, which is on the site of the old NCRR Mt. Washington station, though there is nothing whatsoever left of the buildings associated with the latter.


Date: June 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 15

 

Mapped Scene:

As shown on this segment of the 1876 Hopkins map, in the later part of the 19th century the Kelly Avenue bridge from Falls Road to Mt. Washington did not exist. The Smith Avenue bridge was the only route. Then, as now, the Smith Avenue bridge passed slightly to the north of the church. The 1876 Hopkins map was to all intents and purposes identical to the 1877 Hopkins map mentioned in the original caption of the historic photo.

Map: Hopkins, 1876.

 

 

Scene: Though this old photo is sadly damaged, what is now the Mt. Washington United Methodist Church at 5800 Cottonworth Avenue is fairly easy to make out. The vantage point is Clark's Hill, which runs northward off, and more or less parallel to, Falls Road. The Jones Falls can been seen running diagonally from mid-right to bottom left of the picture. More difficult to make out is Falls Road itself, which is in the immediate foreground, this side of what looks to be hanging laundry.

Orig. caption: "Photo shows the original Mount Washington stone Methodist chapel. The 1877 Hopkins Atlas showed the chapel in close proximity to the mill."

Date: 1880s.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: It is not possible exactly to replicate the vantage point of the historic photo, for its view of the church is now obscured by buildings. This new photo was taken from a position perhaps 30 yards north of the earlier photographer's position. Though modernized, the Methodist church is still in the same place. The Mt. Washington Mill, now an upscale shopping center, is to the right, out of the picture. The Kelly Avenue bridge, seen on the left of this modern photo, did not exist when the historic photo was taken.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
   
On the Links
         

Set 16

 

Historic Scene:

This is the only known photo of the January 5, 1931 fire that destroyed the BCC clubhouse. This shows the fire spreading across the upper floor of the south wing.

Photo: Unknown photographer; Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Scene: The photographer has his back to Edgevale Road, near the 18th green, and is looking south toward the Baltimore Country Club clubhouse. The Roland Park Golf Club, later the BCC, was founded in 1896; the land that would become the course was sold to the club by the Roland Park Co. in separate parcels in the early 20th century, the first 20 acres being bought by the BCC in 1901 for $60,000. Fairways 1, 18 and part of 17 were east of Falls Road; the rest were west of it. (The original plan to have fairways 13 and 14 straddle Falls Road a little further north did not materialize.) The clubhouse's semi-circular veranda was immediately behind and above the 1st tee, and from it could be had a spectacular view of the Jones Falls valley. The Jones Falls could spell trouble, however, periodically flooding the course. This, coupled with the prospect of sharply higher taxes after the city annexation of Roland Park at midnight Dec. 31-Jan. 1, 1918/1919 caused the club to consider an alternative county campus. This became the Five Farms course at Timonium, which was to become the club's mainstay. The Roland Park course was closed in 1962, with the bulk of it sold to the Rouse Company for development into the modern Village of Cross Keys.

Orig. caption: "Baltimore Country Club, Roland Park, Baltimore, Md."

Date: Unknown but probably the mid-1920s. The card has no publication date, but the postmark is dated August 27, 1925.

Photographer: I. & M. Ottenheimer, Baltimore, Md.

Source: Undated postcard; Leslie Goldsmith collection.

 

 

Commentary: The 1896 Roland Park Golf Club was reorganized as the Baltimore Country Club in 1898, and the club's presence, according to James F. Waesche, "would guarantee Roland Park's ascendancy as Baltimore's premiere suburb." The Roland Park Co.'s Edward Bouton, president, took a gamble on the club. The company in some respects bankrolled the conversion of the modest golf club to the prestigious country club. In return for a club guarantee of substantial membership, says Moudry, the Roland Park Co. built the first club house (left) and leased it, and the land for the golf course, to the club a modest rates for a fixed term — enough time for the club to get itself established. Even the eventual sale of the course's land to the club resulted in no direct profit to the company. However, the company was represented on the club's board of directors, and, as Bouton had hoped, the success of the country club had the ripple effect of substantially increasing lot sales by the company.

Designed by the local architectural firm, Wyatt & Nolting, the first, shingle-style clubhouse was very much in keeping with early Roland Park styles. It was, however, sadly fire prone, suffering varying degrees of fire damage in 1905, 1912 and 1930. On January 5, 1931, a devastating fire burned the clubhouse to the ground. (See photo at far left.) This handsome Federal style replacement building (above), constructed on the same site, was opened in 1933.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 17

 

 

 

Scene: This is the view from the BCC clubhouse veranda, looking northwest down on the 1st tee and, beyond, the Jones Falls valley.

Orig. caption: None.

Date: Unknown but the relative insignificance of Falls Road implies that this photo is quite early, perhaps the mid-1920s at the latest.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: www.tillinghast.net.

 

 

Commentary: Taken in summer 2008, this photo shows the plaque marking the site of the BCC's former 1st tee. The fairway itself is remarkably little changed. However, beyond the trees grown up at its foot, Falls Road is now a major thoroughfare. The tall building at the top right of the picture is part of the Village Cross Keys development that in the 1960s was built over the northern half of the course after its closure in 1962.


Date: July 2008.


Photographer:
Anne C. Stuzin.

         
 
         

Set 18

 

Mapped Scene:

The BCC's 1st fairway is shown on the 1935 Matthews map. Interestingly, this map, though published two years after the opening of the flat-fronted new BCC clubhouse, still plainly shows the semi-circular veranda of the pre-1931 clubhouse.

Map: Matthews, 1935.

 

 

Scene: The photographer is standing about halfway along the 1st fairway, looking back up (east) at the front of the pre-1931 clubhouse building, whose semi-circular veranda is wonderfully portrayed here. What these people are doing, why they are running down the fairway, is a mystery. Given the lack of foliage, coupled with a lack of dead leaves, it seems likely the the photo was shot on early spring (probably in the 1920s, judging by the clothes). The runners are all adults, so it is unlikely that this shows an Easter egg hunt. If any reader can shed any light on this, please contact the editor at rphistory@rolandparkorg.

Orig. caption: None.

Date: Unknown, but probably the 1920s.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: This photo was taken from slightly further west and south than the historic photo, but it nonetheless captures the scene adequately for comparison purposes. The dignified front of the 1933 BCC clubhouse is nicely shown.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 19

 

 

Scene: The photo was taken, looking north, from the bottom of the fairway hill shown above at sets 17 and 18. In fact the ridge shown here in the foreground is visible in the set 17 photo too. The ridge and traps constituted the obstacles before the 1st green, to the left and just out of the picture. Visible in the distance are the backs of the houses on the Harvest Road.

Orig. caption: "A shot I took in February 1962 looking across the 1st and 17th fairways and up toward Plover Lane and the rear of Harvest Road houses."

Date: February 1962.

Photographer: John Hammond.

Source: John Hammond.

 

 

Commentary: After the 1962 closure of BCC's Roland Park course, those portions east of Falls Road remained more or less frozen time time, as this photo shows. Despite the passage of four and a half decades between this and the older photo to the left, the scene is virtually identical.


Date: July 2008.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 20

 

Mapped Scene:

The map shows an early plan for the BCC's course and one that never entirely materialized: the 13th and 14th fairways never ended up straddling Falls Road. However, the rest of the course was approximately as shown here. The red circle is drawn around the 2nd tee, which is the scene shown to the right. The water conduit is marked on this BCC plan.

Map: BCC course proposal, 1897.

 

 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking south at two players on the 2nd tee, which was west of Falls Road. Falls Road itself, with its streetcar utility poles, can been seen to the left. This shot's vantage point is almost that same as that of the 1906 photo at set 8, above, except that here we are on the course side of the fence instead of the road side. It is immediately apparent that the Hillside Road houses so prominent in the 1906 photo are absent here. These houses were built between 1902 and 1904. This photo is dated 1898. As the BCC did not start buying its land until 1901, this photo was taken during the period when it simply leased land from the Roland Park Company.

Orig. caption: "The Baltimore Country Club golf course in Roland Park, Baltimore. A member of the Braid family is shown teeing off at a hole near Falls Road. An onlooker is seen standing on the crest of the hill."

Date: 1898.

Photographer: News American.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Many people today assume that the slope between Falls Road and the Poly/Western grounds has something to do with the leveling of the land for the schools' playing fields. In fact, the feature was evident over a century ago, too. Under the slope is the old conduit for water to the Hampden reservoir from Lake Roland. The stretch of land was deeded to the city — after a court case — by Charlotte Harper in April 1858. In the old photo, above the slope (west) stretched the rest of the golf course. Today, ahead and to the right lie Poly and Western and their grounds. Back over the photographer's right shoulder, on the northern 68 acres of the old BCC course, are the buildings of the modern Village of Cross Keys. Ahead and on the other side of the road can been seen the lower slopes of the BCC's flat-topped, manmade tennis court "plateau." Note that this is absent in the historic photo, left, this area instead just being a gently rolling meadow.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 21

 

Mapped Scene:

It is difficult to tell exactly which fairway Fusting and his caddy are on. They appear to be about 300 yards from the mound in the background. The mound is shown at the bottom of this diagram, and 300 yards would put these two a little south of the 7th fairway. The canalizing of the Jones Falls had the effect of straightening the river from about the 8th green to the 3rd tee.

Map: BCC course proposal, 1897.

 

 

Scene: We are looking south from a point somewhere toward the southern end of the golf course. Snaking southward into the distance is the brand-new Jones Falls Expressway (I-83). This stretch of the JFX was opened on November 2, 1962, so this autumnal scene must have been shot just after that. The northbound entry ramp kinks back to the left onto Cold Spring Lane, which at this point was a little further south than is its modern namesake. (A small part of it lives on in the Medfield neighborhood as Old Cold Spring Lane.) The straight white streak between the players and I-83 is a canalized Jones Falls. The dark patch of land just this side of the canal is fill material covering the old riverbed of the Jones Falls, which had previously meandered in and out of the golf course. The prominent mound in the distance was partly leveled in the mid-1960s to provide the site for the Poly/Western school complex and the new Cold Spring Lane route. Much of Poly sits atop this mound now.

Orig. caption: "Determined to be the last golfer to play in town, Bodie Fusting attempts to chip out of an impossible lie."

Date: Undated but must be late 1962.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore Country Club: One Hundred Years.

 

 

Commentary: Very little is recognizable in this scene. The The JFX and the canalized Jones Falls visible in the old photo are here hidden behind the seating stands, built on what in the old photo is the dark dirt filling in the former Jones Falls river bed. The once undulating land of the golf course has been flattened to make a football field. The trees in the background mark the western slope of the mound whose top was leveled to permit the building of Poly's two principal buildings in the late 1960s.

A U.S. Geological Survey map showing the new Cross Keys and Poly/Western buildings superimposed over the topography of the old golf course is here.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 22

 

Mapped Scene:

The red circle shows the approximate position of the photographer, some two thirds of the way up the 10th fairway. The entrance to the modern Village of Cross Keys is about where on this course diagram the stream next to the scale flows east to west across Falls Road.

Map: BCC course proposal, 1897.

 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking south from a point near the 10th green. The modern Village of Cross Keys shopping center is more or less where the lone tree stands in the middle of the picture. The (now partly leveled) mound where presently stand the Poly and Western schools can been seen in the distance toward the right. The houses on the far left are those along Falls Road Terrace.

Orig. caption: "Golf grounds, Baltimore Country Club, Roland Park."

Date: Unknown.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Undated postcard; webmaster's collection.

 

 

Commentary: This photo was taken looking south from Hamlet Hill Road in the Village of Cross Keys. From this point, the 10th green would have been back over the photographer's right shoulder.


Date: January 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 23

 

Mapped Scene:

The red circle shows the position of the photographer, up at the 18th green and looking northwest down the fairway toward what is now the Village of Cross Keys.

Map: BCC course proposal, 1897.

 

 

 

Scene: The photographer is standing in about the same place as the photographer of the clubhouse shot, above (set 16). In the latter, the photographer was looking south at the building; here, he is looking northwest down the 18th fairway toward the Jones Falls valley. The curved road in the middle distance, to the right, is Edgevale Road. The trap at the narrowest part between the road and the trees is the bunker at the 17th green. This scene being relatively little changed today (2010), we have at right shown an aerial view of the course in 1953 instead of a modern photo of the 18th fairway.

Orig. caption: "Roland Park is viewed from the 18th hole of the Baltimore Country Club. In the late 1960s or early 1970s the Club sold the golf course to James Rouse for the construction of the Village of Cross Keys. The course was relocated to Five Farms in Baltimore County."

Date: August 25, 1922.

Photographer: Harry B. Leopold.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Source: ASCS, 1953.

         
 
         
   
Along Edgevale Road
         

Set 24

 

 

Scene: Looking up at 12 Edgevale from Edgevale Road; the photographer has his back to the golf course.

Orig. caption: "A cottage high above the road. 12 Edgevale Road, home of the late George L. Radcliffe, U.S. Senator for Maryland 1935-1947.

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The house itself is remarkably little changed, though the landscaped area in the immediate foreground is now a little overgrown.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         

Set 25

 

 

Scene: This house, 119 Beechdale, sits at the intersection of Beechdale and Edgevale roads.

Orig. caption: "On Beechdale Road."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The rubble gutters along the roadside have gone but, apart from that, the scene is reassuringly similar — virtually identical, indeed.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         

Set 26

 

Mapped Scene:

The house at 100 Edgevale Road is shown on the 1915 Bromley map occupying two lots.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking south along Edgevale  Road; the intersection with Beechdale is ahead and to the left. This Edgevale Road scene is largely unchanged today (right). Other than the addition of shutters, the same goes for the house.

This vintage photo graced the cover of the first issue of the Roland Park Civic League's newsletter, Roland Park Review, October 1908. The Review was a monthly publication, issued through November 1916. Typical editions contained articles on the political issues of the day, real estate, gardening tips, Civic League accomplishments and other morsels of local interest. In 1916, the Review went under, superseded by the Roland Park Co.'s official organ, Gardens, Houses and People.

Though initially not incorporated, the Civic League was formed in 1895 to serve as a fund-raising entity for the Roland Park volunteer fire company; its standing Fire Board and Police Board were, essentially, the neighborhood's public-safety oversight committees. The league also promoted civic involvement in the social and political issues of the day by sponsoring public lectures and the like. In this respect, the league mirrored the activities of the 1896-founded Roland Park Woman's Club (the latter an organization necessary because women were not allowed to join the league; not until November 1908 were women permitted in the league).

Orig. caption: "100 Edgevale Road."

Date: Unknown.

Photographer: Unknown but before October 1908.

Source: Four Walking Tours.

 

 

Commentary: In the early 20th century, the Civic League did not have the semi-homeowners' association role it has today and, given its public-safety responsibilities, its boundaries were larger than is the case today: the city line to the south (which ran east to west across University Parkway), Falls Road to the west, Lake Avenue to the north, and Charles Street to the east. There was at this time no Roland Park Roads & Maintenance Corp., the current responsibilities of which were then undertaken by the Roland Park Co.

At this early stage, the three extant plats had their own homeowners' associations — the Property Holders' Conference of Plat No. 1, the Oakland Club (Plat 2), and the Plat 3 Organization — which were often at odds with the Civic League and each other. (Plats 4, 5 and 6 had not yet been developed.) Roland Park at this time was not the cohesive community it is today and the various plats for many years thought of themselves as distinct neighborhoods within the larger Roland Park project.

The Civic League was eventually incorporated in 1907, 12 years after it 1895 founding, with a charter giving it responsibility for certain maintenance and restrictions matters. Even so, until 1909 real power rested with the Roland Park Co., which was not bound by the decisions of the league. By this time, most lots in plats 1, 2 and 3 had been sold and Roland Park Co. President E.H. Bouton wished to offload maintenance responsibilities onto residents. Though initially ferociously opposed, Roland Parkers finally consented to the creation of a new entity, the Roland Park Roads & Maintenance Corp., to accept these responsibilities. R&M was duly incorporated and on July 26, 1909 ownership of roads and public spaces was transferred to it from the Roland Park Co.

By the early 1910s, membership of and voting rights to the Civic League were open to all Roland Parkers (plats 1-6), including women. But R&M office holding and voting were restricted to residents of plats 1, 2 and 3, because only in these plats had the Roland Park Co. surrended its public-land ownership rights.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 27

 

 

Scene: The photographer is on the 200 block of Edgevale, looking back at the intersection of Harvest Road (coming in from the right) with the 100 block of Edgevale Road.

Orig. caption: "American elm and typical planted triangle at a road intersection. Looking southeast from Edgevale and Harvest Road (on right). Baltimore Country Club, Old Club House in distance (burned in 1930)."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The trees along Edgevale now largely obscure the view of the houses. The latter are, however, little changed in appearance as compared to the Simmons shot at left. The road triangle is certainly more disciplined in appearance than was once the case.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 28

 

 

Scene: Here the photographer is standing on or next to the road triangle featured in the set above (set 27) and is looking west down Harvest Road. At the bottom of the road is a trolley stop shelter on Falls Road. The extraordinary gallows-like affair halfway down Harvest is a street light.

Orig. caption: "Cottages on Harvest Road. Looking west on Harvest Road at Edgevale. Falls Road in the distance."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Though largely hidden by trees these days, the Harvest Road houses are much as they were a century ago. Even the bus shelter in the distance is reminiscent of the old streetcar shelter visible in the old photo. The Harvest/Edgevale intersection is at the very heart of lower Plat 3. In this plat, the Roland Park Co. left behind it the conservatism of Plat 1 and the grandiosity of Plat 2 in favor of experimentation with elements of the back-to-basics Arts & Crafts movement, as evidenced here.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         

Set 29

 

 

Scene: The Plat 3 architects' enthusiasm for the Arts & Crafts style is very evident here in this chalet perched high above the road on the hillside topped by Longwood Road.

Orig. caption: "A shingled cottage above the road. 315 Edgevale Road at Deepdene Road intersection."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The bare hillside photographed by Simmons is now so grown over that a precise replication of the angle of the historic photo produces only this (you can see the chimney, but that is about all). However, moving a little further around the hill gives a decent view of 315 Edgevale as it now looks.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
   
Through Plat 6
         

Set 30

 

 

Scene: Looking east up Deepdene Road toward Roland Avenue. Note the person riding a horse in the distance.

Orig. caption: "Deepdene Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The only major difference between now and a century ago appears to be that modern Deepdene is paved. There is a concrete path on the north (left) side of the road today where previously there was none. But the drystone wall on the left is little changed and the riprap on the right, though now ivy covered, it still in place.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 31

 

Mapped Scene:

The red circle shows the position of the photographer, at the intersection of Deepdene and Edgevale roads.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking east up Deepdene Road from a point further down the hill (west) than the vantage point of the previous set (set 30).

Orig. caption: "Banks supported by riprapping."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: What a tiny difference a century makes! The utility pole on the right, though not literally the same one, is still in the same place. The ivy-covered riprap is much as the Roland Park Co. installed it. The wall on the left, plain concrete in Simmons' day, has of late been improved with facing stones.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 32

 

Mapped Scene:

The photographer has moved about 100 yards north along Edgevale as compared to his position in set 31. He is near the intersection of Edgevale and Englewood roads and is looking south.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: The concrete wall prominent in the previous set (set 31) can be seen here too, on the left, so the photographer is standing about 100 yards north of his previous position. He is booking southward at the Longwood Road ridge, which towers above Deepdene Road. The houses on the hill are those at the western end of Longwood, 220 (left) and 222. The chalet halfway down the slope is 315 Edgevale.

Orig. caption: "Cottages on steep hillside."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Unfortunately, the foreground evergreen almost completely obscures today's view of the Longwood ridge from this spot. The chalet can just be seen through the boughs of the tree, and 220 atop the ridge is partially visible to its left. At the very end of Longwood, 222 is wholly hidden.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 33

 

Mapped Scene:

To take the vintage photo at right, George Simmons stood looking south from either lot 167 or 168 of Plat 6, the latter not yet developed in 1911. He was looking toward Plat 3, which had already been built by 1911 and whose boundary with Plat 6 was Elmwood Road, coming in from the left of the historic photo.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking south from a point near Edgevale and Elmwood roads. Edgevale is the road running up and left from the middle right across the photo. Elmwood can be seen coming in from the left. The vacant land in the foreground now has houses upon it. The photographer is standing in the as-yet undeveloped Plat 6, looking at houses in the already-completed Plat 3.

Orig. caption: "Looking along Edgevale Road."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The old photo at left cannot be replicated precisely because a house now stands upon the spot it was shot from. However, this new photo approximates the old one. The house in the middle distance is that shown exactly in the middle of the historic photo, on the southwest corner of Edgevale and Elmwood. A better view of it is here.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

 
         

Set 34

 

Mapped Scene:

This map is an architect's plan for Edgevale Park, drawn up by Edward Palmer. The inner park is wholly enclosed by the private lots that make up Edgevale Park; there is no access other than through the surrounding houses or their yards.

Source: Same as photo at right.

 

 

Scene: Looking east along Englewood Road toward Edgevale Road. Falls Road is 100 yards or so behind the photographer. The houses shown, mostly duplexes, form the southern flank of Edgevale Park, a mini-development that surrounds its own private park.

Orig. caption: "Edgevale Park, a subdevelopment in Roland Park by Edward L. Palmer, Jr., about 1910."

Date: Circa 1910.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: The Architecture of Baltimore.

 

 

Commentary: Edgevale Park is thematically similar to Merryman Court in Plat 5. (See sets 14 and 15 in "south.") Though architecturally different from each other, both these enclaves allowed Roland Park Co. President Edward Bouton and company architect Edward L. Palmer, Jr. to experiment with the notion of a community within a community. As can readily be discerned here, Englewood Road has changed virtually none in a century. Palmer's influence in Roland Park was substantial. He designed Edgevale Park, shown here. He did not of course design all the buildings in Roland Park; nevertheless, as company architect from 1905 to 1918, he did review all designs.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 35

 

Mapped Scene:

Largely an area of vacant lots in 1911, by the time of the 1915 Bromley map, Merrymount Road was mostly developed, as shown here. For the 1911 photo, Simmons stood in what was then the empty lot 91.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

 

Scene: The photographer is looking south down Merrymount Road. The steep, winding road has been graded and graveled, but, at least along this lower stretch, no houses have yet been built. In the distance, 220 and 222 Longwood Road are in plain view on the ridge (see set 32, above). Below them, Englewood Road may been seen coming in from the right.

Orig. caption: "The beginning of Merrymount Road — winter."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: It is today not possible to get as high on the hill as Simmons was in 1911 because a house now stands on the spot where he stood. Nonetheless, even from a location about 30 feet lower down the slope, the similarity between the old and new scenes is apparent. The shape of the background tree line is just about identical and the tight first curve on Merrymount is immediately recognizable.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 36

 

Mapped Scene:

The photographer, Simmons, is looking southeast from the top of Merrymount Road. The house on the left in the vintage photo is that shown on the map as being owned by H.W. Seymour.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: To take this photo, Simmons stood at the highest point on Merrymount Road and faced southeast, looking back down the hill. The houses shown — which were then, in 1911, brand new — are 21 (left) and 19 Merrymount.

Orig. caption: "Cottages on Merrymount Road" [caption shared with the photo below, set 37 — Ed.].

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The road is now paved, as it was not in 1911, and there are now sidewalks on either side, not just on the west side. No. 14 Merrymount, just visible above at the far right of this photo, had not yet been built at the time of Simmons' 1911 shot. However, 19 and 21 Merrymount are very little changed.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 37

 

 

Scene: For this photo, Simmons stood in front of 21 Merrymount and looked east at 19.

Orig. caption: ""Cottages on Merrymount Road" [caption shared with the photo above, set 36 — Ed.].

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: At least in terms of its exterior appearance, 19 Merrymount Road is virtually unchanged vis-à-vis its historic photo at left, though its original side porch has been enclosed and turned into a room. Visible in the background in the modern shot above is 15 Merrymount, which did not exist when Simmons was photographing this area. (There is no 17 Merrymount Road.)


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 38

 

 

Scene: This is a fascinating photo on two counts. It was taken from the porch of 21 Merrymount looking southwest down the hill. First, this is the only confirmed photo of the photographer himself, George Simmons, a local realtor and later the vice president of the Roland Park Montebello Co. Simmons' Book of Pictures in Roland Park is one of the best records we have of early 20th century Roland Park. In many of the Simmons photos featured on this web site there appears discreetly in the background a man wearing a boater hat. If the photos were taken using a timer, it is possible that the boater-hatted figure is Simmons too, but this is not known with certainty.

Second, the photo shows us how quickly early Roland Park houses were completed. For his Book of Pictures, Simmons took two sets of photos — one set in March 1911 and one set in June. (Many of these photos are featured on this web site.) The March photos show bare, winter landscapes, while the June set shows the lush, sylvan Roland Park residents know and love a century later. The photo above is obviously one of the March shots. What is interesting is that there is little sign of landscaping down the hill in the front yard of 19 Merrymount, shown in sets 36 and 37 above, which were photographed in June 1911. Observant readers will notice some construction detritus beyond Simmons' left shoulder in this photo, but no. 19's garden is obviously incomplete and its two sets of front steps — see set 37 — are absent.

Orig. caption: "Merrymount Road from a cottage porch — winter. View from front porch of 21 Merrymount Road towards Falls Road and Cross Keys. Mr. Simmons is gentleman with derby."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: When Simmons took his Merrymount Road photos in March and June 1911, the development was far from complete. In those days, without houses to block the view, the few Merrymount residents enjoyed, at least in winter, a spectacular vista of the golf course (plainly in view in the old photo at left). The scene today is attractive but, in addition to foliage, the addition of nos. 14 (right) and 19 and 15 (left) Merrymount Road obscure any view down to what today is the Village of Cross Keys. (In the photo above, 19 is out of view and 15 is hiden by foliage, while 14 is visible on the right. When Simmons' photo was taken, 14 and 15 had yet to be built.) This photo was taken by one of the the current (2010) owners of 21 Merrymount Road; the seated figure is the other owner.


Date: April 2010.


Photographer:
James W. Arnold.

 

         
 
         

Set 39

 

Mapped Scene:

The photographer's position is shown by the red circle.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: This is another Simmons photo, taken from Roland Park's northwestern extremity, where Edgevale Road meets Falls Road. Simmons is looking east at the Dutch colonial-style 602 Edgevale Road, on the northern side of the road. Note the right-hand-drive car approaching, perhaps imported from Britain.

Orig. caption: "Cottage on Edgevale Road with detail of doorway" [caption shared with the photo below, set 40 — Ed.].

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: No. 602 Edgevale is not terribly different in appearance from its 1911 look. As with many Roland Park houses, its porch — prominent in the 1911 photo — has been enclosed to make a sunroom. The house still retains cedar roofing shingles, a common roofing material in early Roland Park, now replaced on many houses with asphalt shingles.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 40

 

 

Scene: This is a Simmons photo of the doorway of 602 Edgevale. From the shadow of the leafless, winter tree limbs across the front of the house, the shot can with some certainty be said to be one of Simmons' March 1911 batch of photos.

Orig. caption: "Cottage on Edgevale Road with detail of doorway" [caption shared with the photo above, set 39 — Ed.].

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The Simmons photo at left was presumably taken before 602 Edgevale was quite finished. Above the door, a wire protrudes but there is no light fixture. One has by now been added, of course. Apart from that, very little seems to have changed. Even the doorbell button looks to be the original.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         

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