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Then and Now:

West

 

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Then & Now, Roland Ave.

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The "west" section of this historical site is composed of photos of Plat 2, most of Plat 3 and the strip of Plat 1 that lies west of Roland Avenue, i.e., the houses on the west side of the avenue that front onto it. (While it is in Plat 3, Baltimore Country Club clubhouse photos are grouped with shots of the western part of the old golf course in this site's "northwest" section, as are photos of lower Plat 3.) Plat 2 was the Roland Park Co.'s second development in the area; its planning started in 1897. At this time, Plat 1, mostly east of Roland Avenue, was simply known as "Roland Park," and what was to become Plat 2 was intended as a wholly separate — and higher-end — development with the tentative name of "Braehurst." This name was pushed by the Olmsted brothers' firm, which liked its British ring. (Plat 1 designer George E. Kessler's formal involvement with Roland Park had ended in December 1891, though he continued to advise via correspondence. The Olmsted landscape architects were engaged by Roland Park in November 1897 to take his place.) Another 98 names were suggested by the Olmsteds, including "Ackenshaw," "Chesney-Coombe" and "Ackbroyl." Roland Park Co. President Edward Bouton stalled for a couple of years and then, in January 1900, opted for the simple "Roland Park Plat Two." This was in good measure because the initially struggling sales in Plat 1 had just taken off, and he wanted the new development to be popularly associated with the suddenly very fashionable Plat 1. The photo above is of Plat 2's showpiece block, Goodwood Gardens, the brainchild of architect Charles A. Platt. The photographer is looking northeast out of one of the upper-floor windows of 206 Goodwood. The photo is undated, but St. David's Church, on the far right, appears completed, putting the shot after 1906. (Photo source: Undated period postcard, Noko Publishing Co.; Leslie Goldsmith collection.) Click photos for larger images.

     
 
     
   

Along Roland Avenue

Set 1

 

Mapped Scene:

The Roland Park Country School at 210 Roland Avenue is plainly seen on the 1915 Bromley map. The photographer's position is marked by a red circle.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking west from Roland Avenue toward the front door of the Roland Park Country School's second location, at 4608 Roland Avenue. Initially called the Roland Park School, the then-coed institution was established in 1894, sponsored by the Roland Park Co. It moved to this handsome building, then numbered 210 Roland Avenue, in 1905. (The building was renumbered 4608 after the city's annexation of Roland Park in late 1918.) In 1905, boys' admission was restricted to 4th graders and under. Admission for all boys ceased in 1981. As for 210 Roland Avenue itself, it was designed by Ernest A. Wolf III  and built in 1891, according to tax records. By the late 1990s, by then a private residence, it had fallen into disrepair. It is currently (2010) being restored by an Indian restaurateur.

Orig. caption: "Roland Park Country School at original location — approximately 1908" [actually its second location — Ed.]

Date: 1908.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: The Roland Park School was initially slated to operate out of rooms on the upper floor of the shopping center on the 4800 block of Roland Avenue, though it was objected that this proximity to the streetcar tracks would be dangerous. Accordingly, the Roland Park Co. in summer 1894 installed teachers Adelaide and Katherine Howard at 410 Notre Dame Avenue, now 4810 Keswick Road. The school's first session opened there on September 25, 1894. In 1905, the school moved to 210 Roland Avenue, staying here until 1916. That year, the school moved to 817 W. University Parkway, the former Grace A. Greenway estate, and now (2010) the site of the Roland Park Place retirement community. (Readers looking for 817 W. University will not find it. In the normally understood sense of the term, the address does not exist, the house numbers on that side of the road leaping from 807 to 819 W. University. Rather, the campus was located behind (south of) University Parkway and was accessed by means of a path from the the 800 block. Road access was from 40th Street. Now on this site, Roland Park Place's address is a more logical 830 W. 40th Street.) There were severe fires on the campus in 1947 and 1976. In 1978, the trustees bought the A.R.L. Dohme "Chestnutwood" estate at 5204 Roland Avenue. In October 1980, the school term opened at the new facility, the students solemnly marching up Roland Avenue from their old to their new campus.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 2

 

Mapped Scene:

The 1915 Bromley map shows St. David's and, diagonally opposite it, the then Roland Park Methodist Episcopal church. The Methodist congregation subsequently become Grace Methodist and moved to a larger establishment at the intersection of Charles Street and Northern Parkway. The smaller Roland Park building, 4615 Roland Avenue, passed to the Church of the Brethren, which in 1987 sold it to the North Baltimore Mennonites, who still own it.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking north from the south side of Oakdale Road toward the side of St. David's Episcopal church, 4700 Roland Avenue. St. David's was designed by a local architectural firm, Ellicott and Emmert, who were also responsible for much of the ornate, monumental and usually pale painted architecture of Plat 2. William M. Ellicott lived nearby on Ridgewood Road (set 14).

Orig. caption: "St. David's Church under construction — 1906" [caption shared with the photo below, set 3 — Ed.].

Date: 1906.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: The distinctive shape of the back of St. David's is as easily recognizable in the old as in the new photo. The annex closest to the photographer in the modern shot is not original to the building. I do not known when it was added.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 3

 

 

 

 

Scene: Looking west from the middle of Roland Avenue at the east façade of St. David's. Note the builder's advertisement on the main window.

Orig. caption:"St. David's Church under construction — 1906" [caption shared with the photo above, set 2 — Ed.].

Date: 1906.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: To the church itself, very little has changed over the past century. An outer window has been added for protective purposes. An administrative/preschool building has been added at the right.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 4

 

 

Scene: St. David's again. Same scene as in set 3 but taken from further away, east of the intersection of Roland Avenue and Oakdale Road. A streetcar is passing in front of the church. The rails were pulled up in the late 1940s, so this photo predates that. The device to the right of the foreground tree is possibly an early pedestrian-control light, similar to the one shown here.

Orig. caption: None.

Date: Unknown but before the late 1940s.

Photographer: Unknown

Source: Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: There are fewer trees at this intersection than there were several decades ago but, apart from that, the scene is little changed. More's the pity: the old walk/don't walk light has gone.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
   
         

Set 5

 

 

Scene: Looking north from the southwest corner of Roland Avenue and Oakdale Road at the south side of St. David's.

Orig. caption: "St David's, Roland Park, Md."

Date: Unknown. The card has no publication date and no postmark.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Undated postcard; webmaster's collection.

 

 

Commentary: The scene is gratifyingly similar to that shown in the historic photo at left.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 6

 

Mapped Scene:

This topographical map excellently shows Roland Park's network of lanes and footpaths. In the center of the map are, from bottom to top, the Presbyterian church, the shopping center, the firehouse, the trolley car house and the community stable. The first water tower is just to the left, at the intersection of Long and Tower lanes.

Map: Howland and Spencer, 1953.

 

 

 

Scene: Looking west across the 4700 block of Roland Avenue on a snowy day toward 4708 and 4710 Roland, with the neighborhood's first water tower in the background. Eight artesian wells pumped water to the tower. The tower's surplus water was bottled and sold elsewhere. The tower was 70 feet high and topped with a roofed observation platform. Access was by means of a spiral stairway around the outside of the structure. This blurred and skewed photo is the only known image of the first water tower, built, according to Moudry, in about 1892. A clearer photo of a very similar tower under construction in an unknown part of the country is here (source: Pinto collection). The tower was quite a local attraction and featured prominently in Roland Park Co. advertising, as here (source: Moudry, 1990). The tower's life was a fairly short one. It still appears on the 1915 Bromley map, but a building that was once the Girls' Latin School gymnasium now occupies this site, 2 Tower Lane, this latter building having been built in 1929.

Orig. caption: None

Date: Unknown but late 19th or early 20th century.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: The house on the right is 4710 Roland Avenue, which is little changed compared to the historic photo. The water tower is of course gone. Also, 4708 Roland Avenue is now very different. In the historic photo, 4708 is a stately Roland Park home. Now, it is a comparatively modern rancher-style building with six apartments — very much at odds with the surrounding architecture. How did this happen? The old house was completely destroyed by fire in the late 1950s. It still appears in the 1953 ASCS aerial photo. However, it was burned fairly shortly after that. The new rancher building was completed in 1959.


Date: January 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
   
         

Set 7

 

Mapped Scene:

The house appears on the 1915 Bromley map.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking west at the front of 428 (now 4828) Roland Avenue, one of a number of Italianate villas that grace this part of Roland Avenue.

Orig. caption: "The house of Charles J.B. Swindell at 428 Roland Avenue. Swindell was the president of Swindell Brothers, which was a window glass and bottle manufacturer, with a plant on Bayard at the corner of Russell Street. The stucco-faced house was built in 1908. It had a 93-foot frontage on Roland Avenue. Photo shows the Roland Avenue façade. This picture appeared in the F. Heath Coggins Company's limited edition book, Attractive Homes of Prominent People in Maryland."

Date: 1928.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Though the tree in the middle of the lawn now rather obscures the view of the house, it is nevertheless plain that it is historically well preserved. The only noticeable difference is this: in the old photo, beyond the bay window on the left side, is a portico. This has now gone, the door it once sheltered replaced by a quite small window.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 8

 

 

Scene: Looking east at the north side of 428 (now 4828) Roland Avenue, the same house as shown in set 7.

Orig. caption: "1928 image of the house of Charles J.B. Swindell, 428 Roland Avenue. Swindell was president of Swindell Brothers, window glass and bottle manufacturers, with a plant on Bayard, corner with Russell Street. The stucco faced house was built in 1908; it had a 93 foot frontage on Roland Avenue. [This] shows a side yard and projecting sun room with second story railed porch."

Date: 1928.

Photographer: Unknown but presumably the same as the photo in set 7.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: The short stairway leading out from this sunroom now has iron railings, absent in the 1928 photo. The awnings have been removed. Virtually no other changes seem to have been made.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 9

 

 

Scene: Looking east at the back of 428 (now 4828) Roland Avenue, the same house as shown in sets 7 and 8.

Orig. caption: "House of Charles J.B. Swindell, 428 Roland Avenue. Swindell was president of Swindell Brothers, window glass and bottle manufacturers, with a plant on Bayard, corner with Russell Street. The stucco faced house was built in 1908; it had a 93 foot frontage on Roland Avenue. The rear yard façade."

Date: 1928.

Photographer: Unknown but presumably the same as the photos in sets 7 and 8.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Though it is a little hard to tell because of all the foreground foliage, the back of 4828 Roland Avenue is just about identical to the way it looked in 1928.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 10

 

 

Scene: Looking west from Roland Avenue at 4900 Roland Avenue, on the northwest corner of Roland and Elmhurst. (The house is on the opposite side of Elmhurst from the house featured in the three sets above.) This picture originally appeared in a two-part 1907 article about Roland Park by Otis E. Williams, published in a journal called Indoors and Out. The photo is also reproduced in Roberta Moudry's 1990 M.A. thesis about Roland Park, Gardens, Houses and People. (The name of the thesis was deliberately taken from that of the erstwhile magazine of the by-now long defunct Roland Park Co.).

Orig. caption: Williams: "A New House in the Mission Style, the Walls of Cement Roughcast. Property of Frank Gould, Esq. Price & McLanahan, Architects"; Moudry: "Residence of Frank Gould, Roland Avenue."

Date: Unknown but before spring 1907.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Williams, "The Homebuilders' Suburb."

 

 

Commentary: This house is Roland Park's only mission-style house. It was designed by Price & McLanahan, architects, and built in 1899. The porch has been enclosed by attractive multi-pane windows. This aside, the building is remarkably true to its origins. Price was a Philadelphia architect, professionally active from 1880 until 1916. Initially a proponent of the Arts & Crafts movement, by the end of his career he had moved to modern design.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

   
         

Set 11

 

Mapped Scene:

Marked "public school," Todd's Academy is evident on the 1915 Bromley map. Note that in 1915 the Tuxedo Park section of St. John's Road was still called Euclid Road.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking northwest toward the façade of Todd's Academy, Roland Park proper's first public school. (Evergreen had its own school on Schenley Road. See set 17 in "east.") Todd's Academy stood at the northwest corner of Roland Avenue and St. John's Road. The public school moved to its current location on the 5200 block of Roland Avenue in 1924, whereupon Todd's was demolished. Note the streetcar tracks in the foreground. 

Orig. caption: "Original Roland Park school — 1912. West side of Roland Avenue at N.W. corner St. John's Road — known as 'Todd's Academy.'"

Date: 1912

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: After Todd's was demolished, in its stead were built 5100 and, next door, 5102 Roland Avenue, both built in 1929 (5100 was built on the Todd's lot; 5102, on a hitherto vacant lot). They were designed by Palmer & Lamdin, a Baltimore architectural firm. Until 1917, Edward L. Palmer, Jr. had been the Roland Park Co.'s resident architect. Though he remained involved with Roland Park, he went into private practice in 1917. In 1925, he joined Willis & Lamdin, which was superseded by Palmer & Lamdin in 1929, with which he stayed until 1945. Palmer lived in Roland Park and died in 1952. He and partner William D. Lamdin built a number of notable houses in north-central Baltimore, among them the "Guilford gateway" houses on the 3700 block of St. Paul Street.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
         

Set 12

 

Mapped Scene:

The library building is shown on the 1935 Matthews map, which also, incorrectly, shows Todd's Academy still standing at 5100 Roland Avenue. (In fact, it had been demolished six or seven years before 1935.)

Map: Matthews, 1935.

 

 

Scene: Looking west at the façade of the Roland Park branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. According to the library's web page, it "open[ed] in 1924 on land donated by the Roland Park Civic League." This probably means the Roland Park Co., as the Civic League has never owned land in its own right. The library stands at the northwest corner of Roland Avenue and Longwood Road.

Orig. caption: None.

Date: 1997.

Photographer: David F. Tufaro.

Source: David F. Tufaro collection.

 

 

Commentary: By the early 2000, the library had fallen certainly into a state of shabbiness, if not of outright disrepair. Says the library's web page: "In March 2006 we closed for a significant renovation and expansion of the library for which the Roland Park Library Initiative and the many, many supporters of the library raised more than $2 million. We reopened on December 17, 2007 to a great crowd of enthusiastic supporters." The library initiative is one of Roland Park's proudest accomplishments. The neighborhood used its own contributions to leverage $2 million in grants. The existing building was completely rehabilitated, with sizable additions being grafted to the west and north sides (the latter visible here). A number of photos of the renovation may be found here.


Date: December 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         
   

Along Ridgewood Road

         

Set 13

 

Scrapped Plan:

Wilson Eyre's short 1902 article, "Two Solutions of the Cottage Problem," gives two illustrations of the communal arrangement originally slated for the southwest bend on Ridgewood Road. On the plan above, Falls Road is at the top and Cold Spring Lane at the left. Note that both are narrower than Ridgewood Road.

Source: Eyre, 1902.

 

 

Scene: Looking west along the 100 block of Ridgewood Road. The white house in the background is 108 Ridgewood. This southern part of Ridgewood was originally intended to accommodate a themed cluster of formal houses around a communal T-shaped garden (which would have been where 108 Ridgewood is today). The Olmsteds objected and the plan was dropped, though elements of the plan later resurfaced at Goodwood Gardens (the formal, classical architecture) and Merryman Court (the common garden).

Orig. caption: "Ridgewood Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The scene today is much as it was a century ago. The front door of 108 Ridgewood now has a metal canopy above it, absent 100 years ago. The hydrant in front of the house is still in the same place. In the old photo, just to the left of the hydrant is a horse-tethering post, now long gone, of course. It is in front of the driveway to the now-demolished 106 Ridgewood. (See set 14, below.)


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 14

 

Mapped Scene:

The Ellicott house features prominently on the 1915 Bromley map, described as the D.M. Robinson house (the subsequent owner). Gideon Stieff's future house at 108 Ridgewood is shown as Mrs. F.E. Meyer's house.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking south from the southwest bend of Ridgewood at the then-106 Ridgewood Road. Deeded by the Roland Park Co. to Elizabeth King Ellicott on 24 June 1901, this grand residence was designed by husband William M. Ellicott, a prominent local architect. Ellicott was the designer of St. David's Episcopal church. Built in the French Renaissance style, 106 was not long lived. In 1937, neighbor Gideon N. Stieff, Sr., became concerned that 106 was about to be turned into a nursing home (letter source: Roland Park Roads & Maintenance Corp. files). Stieff lived at 108 Ridgewood (see set 13), and was the chairman of Stieff Silver, as well as president of the Civic League. Rather than let this happen, Stieff bought the property, demolished it, and incorporated the now vacant lot into his own garden.

Orig. caption: "'Formally-styled' home. Residence of William M. Ellicott, Ridgewood Road."

Date: Unknown but before early 1903.

Photographer: William M. Ellicott.

Source: Reproduced in Moudry, Gardens, Houses and People. Orig. in W. Fawcett. 1903. "Roland Park...A Representative American Suburb." House & Garden 3 (4), April 1903.

 

 

Commentary: The 106 Ridgewood lot remains vacant to this day and simply looks to be a large extension of 108's garden. In 1941, Stieff deeded back to the city and the Roland Park Roads & Maintenance Corp. certain parts of the 106 lot, such as the lane behind the land.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 15

 

 

Scene: From the southwest bend on Ridgewood Road, looking northeast at 107 Ridgewood (the closer of the two houses). Like the picture of the Ellicott house (set 14, above), this photo appeared in the April 1903 edition of House & Garden magazine, which carried a feature on Roland Park (and Ridgewood Road in particular).

Orig. caption: None.

Date: 1903

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: House & Garden.

 

 

Commentary: Replicating the angle of the historic photo at left produces a shot in large measure obscured by trees. A better view of 107 Ridgewood today is here. Like many Roland park houses, 107 has had its side porch enclosed and turned into a sunroom. Apart from this, however, the house seems to be very well preserved.


Date: August 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 16

 

 

Scene: Looking west by northwest at 112 Ridgewood Road. This house is opposite no. 107 (see the set above), and the photo comes from the same House & Garden article as that cited above.

Orig. caption: None.

Date: 1903

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: House & Garden.

 

 

Commentary: The originally fairly modest 112 Ridgewood — which would have been brand new when the vintage shot at left was taken — has been considerably enlarged. The south-side porch has been enclosed and a room added above it. The University of Baltimore's Roland Park records indicate that the house was modified in 1923, and this extension may have been the modification in question.


Date: August 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 17

 

 

Scene: This picture shows 114 Ridgewood Road. This photo is also from the April 1903 issue of House & Garden.

Orig. caption: None.

Date: 1903

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: House & Garden.

 

 

Commentary: Nos. 112 and 114 Ridgewood were once very similar. While 112 (see the set above) has been extensively modified, 114 is just about identical to its original appearance.


Date: August 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 18

 

 

Scene: This is 201 Ridgewood Road, a west-facing house on the second block of Ridgewood. Not terribly much is known of the history of this particular house, other than that it was once the home of Clymer White. White was a big mover and shaker in turn-of-the-20th-century Baltimore who, the story goes, rallied the troops and convinced his friends to move to "the country," thereby kicking real estate sales in Roland Park into high gear.

Orig. caption: "201 Ridgewood Road."

Date: Unknown.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Four Walking Tours.

 

 

Commentary: The same house today: lighter in color but otherwise just about identical.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro

         
 
         

Set 19

 

 

Scene: This is the last of the photos of Ridgewood Road houses from the April 1903 issue of House & Garden. The image shows 205 Ridgewood, a house so modified over the years as scarcely to be recognizable today.

Orig. caption: None.

Date: 1903

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: House & Garden.

 

 

Commentary: The house has had an ornate portico added and has been greatly extended on its north (left) side, by having the side porch enclosed and a story added above it.


Date: August 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 20

 

 

Scene: Looking north up Ridgewood Road from its intersection with Oakdale Road, coming in from the right. the house in the background is the "Symington mansion," 218 Ridgewood Road, whose stables on Falls Road feature in set 5, "northwest." Notice the rather primitive street lamp on the utility pole.

Orig. caption: "A road turning. Looking north on Ridgewood Road at Oakdale Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Plainly visible here, the "Symington mansion" was tragically burned down, with loss of life, in December 2007. It is currently (2010) being restored.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 21

 

Mapped Scene:

The Symington house is shown in pink on lot 19, Ridgewood Road. The house on the left in the two photos is that shown on the map as being owned by C.W. Smith.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking west at the northwest bend at the 200 block of Ridgewood Road. The schoolgirls are emerging from the Symington property. The roadside block is for people alighting from horsedrawn carriages to step down upon. A fair number of these still exist in Roland Park, though this particular one has gone. (An example from another part of Ridgewood Road is here.) This photo shows particularly well Roland Park's early road surfacing: dirt and gravel, oiled and compacted.

Orig. caption: "Ridgewood Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Though the stepping block has gone, the utility pole is still in the same place. The Symington house now has a low wall fronting its lot, whereas a century ago there was a hedge. The sapling on the left of the vintage picture is now a mighty tree. The road is of course now paved. Beyond this, there seem to have been no substantive changes to the scene in a century. The Symington brothers (Stuart and Thomas), incidentally, were the developers of Gibson Island (Anne Arundel County), summer retreat of the well-to-do. On the advice of Roland Park Co. President Edward Bouton, the Symingtons hired the Olmsteds to create a master plan for the island.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         
   
Along Club Road
         

Set 22

 

Period Plans:

Two floor plans of the Robinson house appear in C.F. Osborne's 1907 book, Country Homes and Gardens.

Source: Osborne, 1907.

 

 

Scene: Looking north at 6 Club Road. Number 6 was originally the home of a certain Mr. Robinson, but later served as the dormitory building for the nearby Girls' Latin School (see the next set). A picture of the building while owned by Girls' Latin is here (source: Miles, Four Walking Tours, date unknown). A comparison of the Robinson, Girls' Latin and modern photos reveals that the building has changed remarkably little over the years. The only really noticeable thing is the sunroom on the right: it originally had a trellis covering of sorts, which was removed during the Girls' Latin era; it is now roofed. The house was designed by Wyatt & Nolting, the local firm that also designed the first Baltimore Country Club clubhouse, nearby, which was destroyed by fire in 1931 (source: Munsey's Magazine, July 1902).

Orig. caption: "Mr. R. Robinson's house. Wyatt & Nolting, Architects."

Date: Unknown but before 1907.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Country Homes and Gardens.

 

 

Commentary: The Club Road development was the Roland Park Co.'s first attempt at creating a community within a community — other, later ones being Goodwood Gardens, Edgevale Park and Merryman Court. Starting on Roland Avenue and extending west to the country club itself, most of the houses along Club Road are built in the English half-timbered Tudor style. In a radical departure from Roland Park Co. practice until that time, the houses' gardens are walled and fenced off from the road. The idea was to attract high-income, privacy-valuing country club members. (The club itself is treated in the "northwest" section of this site.) The club's presence was extremely useful to the Roland Park Co. All city dwellers coming to play golf or other sports at the club, a major social hub, had to come by streetcar along Roland Avenue, thereby passing some of Roland Park's grandest houses, each an advertisement in architecture for the company's wares.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro

         
 
         

Set 23

 

Mapped Scene:

The photographer has his back to the country club and is looking more or less east at Girls' Latin, formerly Mrs. E. Knapp's house.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: From Club Road, looking east by northeast at 10 Club Road, site of the former Girls' Latin School. Girls' Latin was founded in 1890 as a preparatory project of Goucher College, then located in lower Charles Village. Girls' Latin was located on the Goucher Campus. In 1890, Girls' Latin was separated from Goucher because the National Association of Collegiate Alumnae was opposed to colleges with in-house preparatory divisions. The now independent school leased space from Goucher for a while before moving to 1217 St. Paul Street in 1914. The school bought 10 Club Road in 1927. A decade later the school, bankrupt, was sold to its own alumnae in 1937, who continued to run it, though with ever diminishing success. The school closed permanently in 1951. A 1903 advertisement for Girls' Latin is reproduced at right, though in 1903 the school was still co-located with Goucher College (the "highest and newest section of the city" described in the ad refers to Charles Village).

Orig. caption: "Girls' Latin School — 1928."

Date: 1928.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: Now an apartment building, the old Girls' Latin building, at least in external appearance is very little changed. It was designed by E.H. Glidden Jr., and built in 1903, according to tax records.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

Click image to enlarge ad.

         
 
         

Set 24

 

 

Scene: Looking north from Long Lane at the south-facing façade of the Girls' Latin gymnasium. Located at 2 Tower Lane, the gymnasium was built on the site of Roland Park's first water tower (set 6). According to tax records, this building was erected in 1910 but this seems unlikely, given that Girls' Latin did not move to Roland Park until 1927. The University of Baltimore collection of Roland Park records, however, gives 1929 as the year, altogether more plausible. E.H. Glidden, Jr. was the architect.

Orig. caption: "Gymnasium, Girls' Latin School, Roland Park, Baltimore, Md."

Date: Unknown. The card has no publication date and no postmark.

Photographer: Hugh Gwynn, Morgan & Millard, Inc., Baltimore, Md. (The card appears to be a painting based on a photo.)

Source: Undated postcard; Leslie Goldsmith collection.

 

 

Commentary: An exact replication of the historic scene simply gives a view of a comparatively modern garage. A better sense of the scene may be gleaned for a shot taken from a different angle, here (source: Murray West, March 2010). The latter show shows a building very little changed since 1929. The building these days is owned by the Roland Park Country School, which bought it in 2001 and which uses it as a squash facility. It had previously been owned by a local area family, which had rented it out for squash playing.


Date: March 2010


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 25

 

Mapped Scene:

The photographer's position at the intersection of Club and Goodwood roads is marked by a red circle. Wyatt's house is shown as such.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

 

Scene: Opposite the Girls' Latin dormitory at 6 Club Road (set 22) stands 5 Club, at the intersection of Club and Goodwood roads. The house was designed, owned and lived in by J.B. Noel Wyatt (1847-1926), a principal at Wyatt & Nolting. Wyatt & Nolting was a prominent local architectural firm, whose well known local designs included the Tudor-style shopping center, the firehouse, the first Baltimore Country Club clubhouse, and the Presbyterian and Methodist churches, the latter now owned by the North Baltimore Mennonites. (The Methodist congregation is these days at Charles Street and Northern Parkway.)

Orig. caption: None

Date: Unknown but before 1907.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Country Homes and Gardens.

 

 

Commentary: Though largely screened from the road in a manner it was not a century ago, 5 Club Road has changed virtually none since the vintage photo at left was shot. The crisscross balustrade atop the porch roof has gone (replaced by something simpler), and one of the foreground stone balls has disappeared. There are no other discernable differences. A Roland Park booster, owner Wyatt had been educated at Harvard, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Ecole des Beaux Arts. From 1902 to 1911, he was Baltimore chapter president of the American Institute of Architects.


Date: March 2010


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 26

 

 

 

Scene: Looking south along Goodwood Road from its intersection with Club Road. The house at the left is 5 Club Road (see the entry above).

Orig. caption: "Trees and planted slope on Goodwood Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The scene is certainly recognizable a century on. The large tree just to the left of center is by all appearances the same one as that shown in the corresponding position in the 1911 Simmons picture at left (note the prominent limb jutting to the right). Absent in the historic picture, but visible in the new one, is the house's garage, recessed into the embankment. This was designed in 1926 by the well known local architect, Laurence H. Fowler.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 27

 

Front View:

South-facing façade of Rusty Rocks. The house was built in 1907 on the site of a disused quarry, the lot being, in Bouton's view, unsuitable for sale. A number of Roland Park houses have foundations built of stone from this quarry.

Source: Undated postcard; webmaster's collection (Hugh Gwynn, photographer).

 

 

Scene: The photographer is at the top of Sunset Path (at its intersection with Goodwood Road), looking west. On the right, behind the hedge, is the Baltimore Country Club. On the left is Rusty Rocks, Roland Park Co. President Edward H. Bouton's third and final home in Roland Park.

Orig. caption: "A typical pathway."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Though nestled out of view, Rusty Rocks is one of Roland Park's most notable dwellings. It was designed by the Olmsted brothers, and bears all the hallmarks of the rusticity they favored. The quarry that furnished the lot upon which the house is built has been masterfully configured into a series of natural looking terraces and a pond (source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park).


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         

Set 28

 

Mapped Scene:

Bromley's 1915 map shows E.H. Bouton's beloved Rusty Rocks property.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

 

Scene: Looking north along Boulder Lane from near its intersection with Ridgewood Road. Everything on the right is part of Edward Bouton's Rusty Rocks property. (See set 27, above.) Simmons must have been standing on something to take this photo: in this shot, the Rusty Rocks house can be seen beyond the foreground building; in the modern shot at right, taken by an average-height man, the house cannot be seen, other than the very top of the further away chimney.

Orig. caption: "Boulder Lane."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: There is no mistaking this scene. Unfinished in 1911, the western wall of the Rusty Rocks property is obviously complete now. In the historic photo, beyond the distant car there appears to be a building of sorts, possibly a garage or an outbuilding at the Baltimore Country Club. Whatever it was, it is gone now. On the 1915 Bromley map, it appears as the smaller of the two buildings shown on Hillside Road lot 7.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         
Set 29
 

 

Scene: Looking south from the north end of Boulder Lane, looking toward Ridgewood Road. Bouton's Rusty Rocks is on the left (see sets 27 and 28, above).

Orig. caption: "Boulder Lane."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The same scene today, so immediately recognizable that no commentary is needed, other than to note that the lower part of the retaining wall is somewhat higher than it was in 1911.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         
   
Goodwood Gardens
         
Set 30

 

Period Plan:

Charles A. Platt's original schematic for Goodwood Gardens appears in C.F. Osborne's 1907 book, Country Homes and Gardens.

Source: Osborne, 1907.

 

 

 

Scene: Looking north along Goodwood Gardens. This photo excellently shows the rubble gutters once ubiquitous throughout Roland Park. The road has an oiled dirt surface. Asphalt did not come to Roland Park until after annexation by Baltimore City, December 1918. Goodwood Gardens' large and elaborate houses were mostly designed by Ellicott and Emmert, Parker and Thomas (designers of the Belvedere Hotel), and Edward L. Palmer, Jr.

Orig. caption: "Goodwood Gardens in summer."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Goodwood Gardens was the Roland Park Co.'s second successful attempt at a themed mini-development within a larger development (Plat 2), Club Road having been the first. An early attempt at something similar at the southern end of Ridgewood Road had foundered on the Olmsted brothers' objections (see set 13). The Goodwood Gardens project was the brainchild of architect and landscape designer Charles A. Platt, though he ended up designing only one of the actual houses. Goodwood Gardens was and remains Roland Park's most grandiose and formal block.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         
Set 31

 

Mapped Scene:

The red circle at Kenwood and Goodwood marks the photographer's position.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Taken from approximately the same location as the photo shown in set 30 (the intersection of Goodwood Gardens and Kenwood Road), but three months earlier, this winter photo better shows the scale of the Goodwood Gardens architecture than does the summer shot.

Orig. caption: "Goodwood Gardens in winter."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Attractive as they may be, the prominent yew trees unfortunately completely hide what would otherwise be a good view of 200 Goodwood Gardens. Though not original, the cast iron utility pole is of a type once common in Roland Park.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         
Set 32
 

 

Scene: Looking west at 206 Goodwood Gardens.

Orig. caption: "A house in Goodwood Gardens."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The house appears little, if any, changed. It would be nice to think that the foreground trees are those shown as saplings in the vintage photo, but they are not. Neither is in quite the same position.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         
Set 33
 

 

Scene: Another view of 206 Goodwood Gardens, this one an early 20th century postcard. The postmark is dated June 23, 1910. In the photo above (set 32), there is a sapling to the left of the entrance gateway. In this photo, it has not yet been planted.

Orig. caption: "Goodwood Garden [sic] residence, Roland Park."

Date: Circa winter 1909-1910.

Photographer: Hugh R. Gwynn.

Source: Undated postcard; webmaster's collection.

 

 

Commentary: The row of evergreen shrubs has gone, but little else is visibly changed. The foreground tree may be the sapling in the middle of the historic photo.


Date: March 2009.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro

         
 
         
   
Commercial Heart
         

Set 34

 

Aerial View:

This excellent aerial shot of the business block shows the C-shaped old driveway and the car house behind the fire station. The photo is undated but was obviously taken before the end of Roland Park's streetcar service in 1947. Note that the southern addition to the shopping center is already in place.

Source: Baltimore Streetcar Museum.

 

 

Scene: Looking northwest from Roland Avenue at the façade of the Roland Park shopping center at 4800 Roland Avenue. Plat 1, Block 21 was reserved for business usage by the Roland Park Co. as early as 1891. The company always referred to this as the "business block" and it was the only block in Roland Park proper where commercial activities were permitted. This is still the case. The company's own office was in this building, which was designed by Wyatt & Nolting. Construction started in December 1893, according to Waesche. The structure beyond the shopping center is the Roland Park trolley station. Roland Avenue northbound trolleys passed the shopping center, turned sharp left into the station just beyond the center, left onto Long Lane, and then left onto Upland to get back to Roland Avenue. An earlier — probably mid-1890s — shot shows the same scene but without the streetcar shelter in the background (source: Four Walking Tours).

Orig. caption: "Roland Park Pharmacy."

Date: Circa 1910.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Period postcard; webmaster's collection.

 

 

Commentary: On the national register of historic buildings, the Roland Park "business block" is sometimes said to have been the first purpose-built "strip mall" in the U.S., though Moudry dismisses this. Now occupied by a French restaurant (Petit Louis), the southern end of the building for decades housed one drugstore or another. The first was G.W. Truitt's drugstore. Truitt left in 1909, his place taken by Morgan & Millard's drugstore and, later, Charles J. Nuen's, which was there until 1980. Since that time, restaurants have taken the spot, first one called Morgan Millard and, now (2010), Petit Louis. Note that the extension on the left of the modern photo, which houses Petit Louis' main dining room, is a comparatively recent — perhaps 1920s — addition, absent in the historic photo. When the building first opened, an ice-cream parlor occupied the northernmost unit. When the business block first opened, and for many decades thereafter, the driveway was a C shape, with entry from and exit to Roland Avenue. Now it is J shaped, with entry still from Roland, but exit now onto Upland. The C-shaped drive is seen in the aerial shot at the far left.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 35

 

Mapped Scene:

On this segment of the 1915 Bromley map, the shopping center is shown in pink on block 21. The trolley shelter is just north of it, on lot 5. The fire station is also pink, just behind the business block. And the car house is labeled United Railways & Electric Co.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking south at the north face of the shopping center, with the trolley station in the foreground. The Lake Roland Elevated Railway, later the no. 10 trolley line, opened on May 2, 1893, making its way to Roland Park from downtown through Hampden all the way up to Lake Roland. The no. 10 was later joined by the no. 29, which as of October 1908 came to Roland Park via University Parkway. At a date unknown, the no. 10 ceased to go all the way to Lakeside, stopping instead at the shopping center — at which point an initially unnamed line, ultimately designated the no. 24 line, took over the duty of taking passengers from Roland Park to the lake.

Orig. caption: "Street railway shelter at shopping center, Roland Avenue and Upland Road."

Date: Unknown.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore Streetcar Museum.

 

 

 

Commentary: Trolley service to Roland Park ended on June 22, 1947 when, that day, the no. 29 streetcar service was superseded by a bus line. (The no. 10 had already ceased to come further north than the Roland Water Tower, in 1940.) The no. 24 trolley struggled on for a couple of years, but only up at the Lakeside end of its line. It did not come as far south as Roland Park after June 1947. Soon thereafter, the Roland Park trolley shelter was demolished, its place taken by extra parking for the "business block."


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         

Set 36

 

 

Scene: Just below the trolley shelter, streetcars turned left (south) onto Long Lane, as shown here. The shelter and Roland Avenue are in the background. The photo is undated but must have been taken some time between the 1936 introduction of PCC (Presidents' Conference Committee) cars and the closure of the no. 29 trolley line in 1947. A second photo of the same scene is dated 1946, and the photo above is probably from the same era (second photo source: www.btco.net).

Orig. caption: "Car #7114 prepares to swing out from the Roland Park Station into Long Lane for the start of its trip to Pratt and Calvert Streets in Downtown. Route #29's Northern portion contained a healthy amount of reserved trackage ideal for the PCC's speed."

The caption for the second photo is "Car #7111 takes layover at the Roland Park Station on Route #29 in late 1946. Behind it rests a charter car from the Baltimore Chapter NRHS. Car shows the difference in gloss between pre-war and war cars, as war cars like this had a flat colored roof."

Date: Between 1936 and 1947 (first photo); 1946 (second photo).

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: www.btco.net.

 

 

Commentary: With the end of trolley service to Roland Park in 1947, the shelter was demolished and the space turned into a parking lot. There is, however, a vestige of the old streetcar era that survives. The trackage shown in the vintage photo at left was used to make a crash guard on the west side of Long Lane, a crash guard still very much in place. (See the photo immediately below.)

 


Date: August 2009 (both photos).


Photographer:
D.P. Munro (both photos).

         
 
         

Set 37

 

 

Scene: Looking north from Upland Road at the front of the Roland Park firehouse, said to be the oldest continuously used firehouse in Baltimore City. The station house was designed by Wyatt & Nolting, architects. Though now staffed by professional Baltimore City firefighters, the station originally housed volunteer firemen, whose actions were governed by the Roland Park Civic League. In this very early shot, there is still an alley between the back of the shopping center (far right) and the firehouse. This alley is now built over by the shopping center southern extension and various other out buildings. The alley was beginning to be built over as early as 1915 (see the Bromley map segment at set 35).

Orig. caption: "The Roland Park Fire House on Upland Road was once part of Baltimore County, but became part of the extensive county infrastructure and economic tax base acquired by Baltimore City through annexation in 1918."

Date: Circa 1902.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Built between 1896-1902, a century-plus has left the firehouse remarkably unscathed. The two arched entrances have yielded to larger, flat-topped doors. Apart from this change, however, the exterior of the building is much as it was. In 2010, the interior of the building was modernized fairly extensively, in good part with funds raised in, or leveraged by, the Roland Park area community.


Date: November 2008.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

 
         

Set 38

 

 

Scene: An early Roland park fire engine.

Orig. caption: "Roland Park's Baltimore County Fire Engine #11, a 1911 Webb-Thomas triple combination pumper. Seen here are: John D. Meakin, lieutenant; H. Leroy Thomey, driver; "Tramp Dog"; Cockey Bortner; William H. Hundermark; and Fred Hofstetter, captain."

Date: 1919.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Roland Park's current (2010), much loved engine no. 44.


Date: November 2008.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 39

 

Mapped Scene:

The Roland Park loop around the shopping center, and the tracks to the car house, are shown on this map of northwest Baltimore lines as of 1945. The no. 10 line is not shown because it had converted to trackless trolley in 1940.

Map: www.btco.net.

 

 

 

Scene: Streetcar parked as though turning east onto Upland Road from the Roland Park car house, behind and to the left. (There is in fact no motorman driving the car, which therefore was presumably stationary when this shot was taken.) The firehouse is on the right. Note the grille on the front of the trolley to prevent people falling under it.

Orig. caption: "The street car ride into the city began and ended at Roland Avenue and Upland Road. Those who wished to continue northward transferred here to the Lakeside trolley. This car went to the amusement park and falls which were part of Lake Roland."

Date: Unknown.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Four Walking Tours.

 

 

Commentary: Other than the crash guards made of old trolley rails on Long Lane (see set 36), there is little evidence now that this location was once a fairly major streetcar hub.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 40

 

 

Scene: Streetcar emerging from the Upland Road car house, about to turn east onto Upland Road. The sign on the front of the car reads, "Johns Hopkins/5th Regiment Athletic Meet, Sat., [illegible] 20th." Some sense of the interior of the car house may be had from this second photo (second photo source: www.btco.net).

Orig. caption: "Car #1012 in front of the Roland Park car house — approximately 1912."

The caption to the second photo reads, "It seems odd to see a 'First of the new cars" placard on a vehicle ending in number 23, but #7023 was indeed Baltimore's first PCC. The first Westinghouse car, it arrived in 1936, and is shown here in Roland Park Car House well before entering service. In practice, route #29 never operated 'Louies', as these cars were called. This car would later be renumbered #7301."

Date: Circa 1912 (first photo), 1936 (second photo).

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Roland Park Revisited.

 

 

Commentary: The Park Lynn Apartments at 4 Upland Road have long since taken the place of the old car house, which closed in April 1947.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

 

         
 
         
   
Hills and Dales  (Upper Plat 3)
     

Set 41

 

Mapped Scene:

The photographer is standing in the turning circle and is looking north by northeast at the house on lot 19.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking northeast at one of the houses at the foot of Elmhurst Road.

Orig. caption: "A cottage on Elmhurst Road."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The sunroom on the left has had a second story added to it. The tree just behind the evergreens is presumably one of the two in the corresponding position in the historic photo at left.

While the lower part of plat 3 is dominated by Edgevale Road, the upper part of the plat is quite distinct. The primary characteristic of upper Plat 3 is the "fingers" of land that radiate west from Roland Avenue, divided from each other by small ravines. From south to north, and in ascending order of steepness, the "fingers" are Elmhurst Road, St. John's Road, Midvale Road and Longwood Road. The "fingers" are well illustrated on this 1903 pre-Plat 3 relief map drawn up by the Olmsted brothers.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
         

Set 42

 

Mapped Scene:

Facing north, the photographer is looking at what on the map is given as the G.W. Atkinson house.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking north from Beechdale Road at a house on the even-numbered side of the street.

Orig. caption: "The 1910-1911 home of John A. Watts, listed in Polk's as a commercial merchant, 4 Beechdale Road, Roland Park, Baltimore, shows the street façade."

Date: 1928.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Baltimore County Public Library.

 

 

Commentary: Once in a while one encounters a Roland Park house built without a porch, but with one now added. It is virtually unheard of for a house originally to have had a porch, later removed. Nevertheless, such is the case with 4 Beechdale Road, which once sported a fine porch the width of the house. A review of the Roland Park records held by the University of Baltimore reveals that the house was altered in August 1928, with Addison J. Worthington as the supervising architect. It is quite possible that the porch was removed at this time.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 43

 

 

 

Scene: This photo of 6 Beechdale Road is part of the Pinto collection of Roland Park memorabilia. The date and photographer are unknown. However, a careful examination of the photo reveals that the house next door, 4 Beechdale, has here already lost its porch — an event that probably happened in August 1928 (see set 42).

Orig. caption: None.

Date: Unknown but after August 1928.

Photographer: Unknown.

Source: Anthony F. Pinto III collection.

 

 

Commentary: The lower sunroom has been enclosed, a common enough occurrence in Roland Park. More unusually, the once open portico has also been enclosed. Apart from these alterations, this handsome house appears to be much as it was.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

Set 44

 

Mapped Scene:

No. 114 St. John's Road is the house sitting on lot 76 on this map, though in reality the house is a little further east, a little closer to the neck of the turning circle, than shown here.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

 

Scene: Looking north at 114 St. John's Road.

Orig. caption: "A singled cottage on St. John's Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The awnings have gone and a set of stone steps down to the road has been added, but few other exterior changes have been made. Even the rubble roadside gutter is still in place.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
 

Set 45

 

 

Scene: Looking west down Indian Lane, the alley between St. John's and Midvale roads.

Orig. caption: "Indian Lane."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Now paved, Indian Lane runs along the ravine that separates St. John's and Midvale roads. It is not known how it came by its name.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
 

Set 46

 

Mapped Scene:

The photographer is standing in the turning circle facing the F.H. Clark house.

 

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking southwest at the end of Midvale Road.

Orig. caption: "At the end of Midvale Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The scene today is virtually unchanged. The fire hydrant is in the same place.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
 

Set 47

 

 

 

Scene: Looking west from near the top of Elmwood Road. As this photo shows, even as late as 1911 Plat 3 was not fully developed. Note the vacant lot beyond the second white house, a lot now built out (see the new photo at right).

Orig. caption: "Stuccoed cottages on Elmwood Road — winter."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Elmwood Road runs down the ravine between Midvale and Longwood roads. It has not changed much in a century.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
 

Set 48

 

Mapped Scene:

The photos at right were taken looking east up Elmwood from its intersection with Laurel Path, which is shown but not named on the map. In the photos, the steps show the path's termination point.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

Scene: Looking east back up Elmwood Road. Though no houses are in view in this shot, old Roland Park's dirt roads and rubble gutters are fully on display.

Orig. caption: "Elmwood Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The same as scene today, though without the rubble gutters or unpaved road.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
 

Set 49

 

 

Scene: Looking east back along Longwood Road (toward Roland Avenue). The exceedingly steep-sided Longwood Road was one of the most difficult to develop for the Roland Park Co., which solved the problem by building houses directly into the hillside.

Orig. caption: "Longwood Road — showing raised sidewalk and planted slope."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The house on the right is 207 Longwood, which in 1911 was just a "lot for sale" sign. The white house in the distance on the left is 202 Longwood. In the modern photo, the roof of 204 can be seen — but only the roof because the house is built into the hillside below the level of the road. In the old photo, 204 is merely a pile of building materials at the side of the road. In the old shot, there is a hydrant along the sidewalk, which is no longer there. This is the only instance in this series of a hydrant's having been present in the early shot but absent in the modern.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
 

Set 50

 

 

 

Scene: Looking east along the even-numbered (north) side of Longwood Road. Most of the houses here are built into the hillside and are substantially below the level of the road, which is over the ridge at the right. The Plat 3 preoccupation with Arts & Crafts simplicity is evident here.

Orig. caption: "Cottages on the steep slope below Longwood Road."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: The cedar roof shakes have given way to asphalt shingles. but little else has changed.  This row of Swiss-style chalets was built by the Roland Park Co. The houses were designed by Edward L. Palmer, Jr.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
 

Set 51

 

 

 

Scene: Looking west at the last house, no. 222, on Longwood Road, with the golf course beyond it (particularly evident beyond and to the right).

Orig. caption: "Circle at the end of Longwood Road."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Though the planted island at the end of Longwood has long since disappeared, the house itself is instantly recognizable. The small utility pole to the left of the house in the old photo has been replaced by a far bigger one, though the location is still the same. The golf course is no longer around, of course, and, even it if were, the trees have grown such that even in winter there is little view through them.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
 

Set 52

 

 

 

Scene: In the set above (set 51), beyond the vintage car there is a footpath just visible. This photo was taken from that footpath, looking north at the same house featured in set 51.

Orig. caption: "A sunken garden."

Date: March 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: Beyond the portico a downspout has of late been added where none was previously. Other than that, the scene looks wholly unchanged.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
Murray West.

         
 
 

Set 53

 

Mapped Scene:

In 1911, to take this photo, Simmons stood on Longwood Road at about the boundary between lots 23 and 24 (the latter not so identified on the map), and looked down the hill toward lot 25. In 1911, lot 24 was vacant; by the time of the 1915 Bromley map, 218 Longwood had been erected on it.

Map: Bromley, 1915.

 

 

 

Scene: View from near the end of Longwood Road, looking northwest toward the upper end of the golf course. The nearby house on the left is 220 Longwood Road. The house in the distance is 608 Edgevale Road. The vacant land between this last and the photographer is what will one day be Edgevale Park. (A better Simmons shot of this vacant land may be viewed here; this is the same scene as that above, but photographed in winter.) The man in the straw boater appears in a number of Simmons photos; it may very well be Simmons himself.

Orig. caption: "View over land near Falls Road."

Date: June 1911.

Photographer: George B. Simmons.

Source: A Book of Pictures in Roland Park.

 

 

Commentary: When Simmons was doing his photography rounds, 218 Longwood had not yet been built. Now obviously this house blocks such view as may remain through the trees of Edgevale Park. Even so, the scene is recognizable: the fieldstone wall is little changed and 220 Longwood is much as it was.


Date: March 2010.


Photographer:
D.P. Munro.

         
 
         

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